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Category: Knife Lists (page 2 of 6)

30 of the Strangest (or Ugliest) Spyderco Knife Designs Ever

Regular readers here at the Knife Depot blog know just how much we love Spyderco Knives. We’ve written a number of blog posts about the iconic brand, as well as a comprehensive article about its history, designers, innovations, and more.

Despite our gushing over Spyderco Knives, we’re not afraid to say the company comes up with some of the most bizarre and strange-looking designs ever. Although many people would call some designs downright ugly, their functionality-over-looks mentality is part of why we love them so much.

I went through some of the most unique blade shapes already, which featured more than a few Spydies, but I wanted to dedicate a whole post to interesting Spyderco knives.

I originally wrote this post a few years ago with 10, but I’ve since gone through the archives of products and seen some of the latest models and thought it would be a good idea to give this list an update.

So now, instead of the 10 most awesomely bizarre Spyderco knives, here are the 30 most awesomely bizarre Spyderco knives.

1. Spyderco Matriarch 2 with Wave

The original list featured the Civilian, but I’ve come to realize the Matriarch 2 with the Wave feature is even more strange. Long-time Spyderco fans have probably become inured to the odd look of the knife since the larger version has been around since the 1990s, but if you give this knife to the common person, they’d likely be confused.

It has a fully serrated patented reverse S-blade with the wave featured made by Ernest Emerson. Users can engage the knife in a single motion out of the pocket. The blade shape and wave give this an almost reptilian look.

2. Spyderco Captain

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From the fierce Matriarch 2 with Wave to the pudgy Captain. This discontinued knife had a 4-inch blade with a shape like no other. The lower part of the blade was curved with a bulbous tip. The handle was also somewhat blocky and peppered with screws and rivets.

Part of the reason it was probably discontinued was the fact that it was unclear what the goal of the knife was.

3. Spyderco Roadie

Next up is the Roadie — one of the most recent models on this list. This design came about after the TSA announced it was going to allow certain knives on planes. Working within those limitations, Spyderco made the Roadie.

But when the TSA reversed its decision to allow knives on planes, Spyderco went forward with the release. Despite its very odd look, the knife is beloved by diehards. It has a 2.09-inch blade that looks like the head of a dodo and a slender handle. The blade opens up with a pair of symmetrical dimples and doesn’t look intimidating at all.

Strange indeed.

4. Spyderco Q

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Simply named the Q, this knife featured a fascinating design that’s come in a ton of variations — at least 50 according to Spyderco Source. The standard version of the Q has a cutout blade design with the Spyderco logo on a web. The handle also has cutouts and comes in different colors.

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15 Pocket Knives That Weigh Less Than an Ounce

Every ounce counts.

When it comes to knives, you might be thinking to yourself what’s a few ounces? Is the Cold Steel Spartan at 10 ounces really so much heavier than the Kershaw Chill at 2 ounces? The answer is yes.

If you’re just going for a walk around the block, you might not notice the weight, but carry the knife for hours on end and you’ll feel that sag in your pocket like a ton of bricks.

I’m starting a series of posts about knives under certain weights for those looking to cut back on their EDC weight. So let’s start with the lightest a knife can get: less than an ounce.

Yes, knives that weigh in at under an ounce can be just as useful as those boasting bigger designs. Here’s a look at some of the best.

Spyderco Manbug

When you want a small knife, look no further than Spyderco. The famous spider brand is well-known for creating minuscule knives that look identical to some of their bigger counterparts. The Spyderco Ladybug and Honey Bee could have been on this list, but instead of completely stuffing it with Spydies, I thought I’d stick with a few, including the Manbug.

Nothing against the feminine-sounding Ladybug (which is a fantastic knife), but if I had to choose one knife with a typical Spyderco design under an ounce, it would be the Manbug. This knife is a little beefier and easier to wield than the Ladybug. It has a 1.875″ blade made from VG-10 and FRN handles. Coming in at .65 ounces, the Manbug is a hard-working knife that you’ll barely feel in your pocket.

Gerber LST Ultralight

The Gerber LST Ultralight was one of our Badass Knives of the Week a while back. How does a sub-ounce knife get that distinction? It features a reliable lockback design and has history on its side. The original LST was brought to market more than 35 years ago by Pete Gerber himself.

The ultralight version has a 1.96-inch blade made from 420HC stainless steel and glass-filled nylon handles — one of the first knives to ever use it. The best part is that this inexpensive and .6-ounce knife is made in the United States.

Victorinox Classic SD

When it comes to knives, it doesn’t get more iconic than the Victorinox Classic SD. This Swiss Army Knife model may be the best-selling knife ever with countless being sold around the world. The reason is simple: this tiny knife is lightweight, multifunctional, and all anyone can ask for in a small pocket knife.

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8 Awesome (and Impractical) Kitchen Knife Block Designs

I can’t tell you when the kitchen knife block was invented or who it was invented by, but it remains one of the best inventions for the kitchen since sliced bread.

Prior to the knife block, the vast majority of Americans simply tossed their fine kitchen cutlery into a drawer, only to get dinged up and scratched.

The knife block offers a solution that saves space and keeps your kitchen knives protected from wear and tear. While knife blocks have their flaws — they’re often impossible to clean, sometimes dull the knives, and often come in unnecessary sets — they are one of the most popular kitchen knife storage solutions around.

With all that said, the basic design of the knife block and its prevalence in kitchens across the world make the knife holder ripe for parody and creativity. That’s where these knife blocks come into the picture.

These knife blocks prioritize artistry over function and they’re entirely impractical but they’re just so darn visually stimulating.

Wolverine Knife Holder

This is the block that inspired me to write this post. Behold the pinnacle of insanity in all its glory. The Wolverine Steak Knife Holder is one of the coolest and most creative knife blocks around, and it’s also the least functional.

The fists are made with a 3D printer from plastic but can only hold six knives. You’d only be able to store your steak knife set and would have to find another solution for your chef’s knife/paring knife. On top of that, the knives aren’t that easy to get out. Oh, and did I mention that the knives stick up out into the air?

The maker of this holder on Etsy seems pretty cool and straightforward about the piece as more of a conversation starter than a functional knife storage system.

Buyer assumes all responsibility for safety once purchased…. seriously, steak knives set backwards in a knife block? Use your best judgement when displaying, using, populating your home with animals or children… or drunk people.

All of you looking to get your hands on one of these hands is out of luck for now. The item sold earlier this month.

Star Wars X-wing Knife Holder

If you thought the Wolverine knife block was insane, the creators of this knife block said, “Hold my Bantha milk.” You may have already seen this knife block before — if you haven’t already bought a few as housewarming gifts — but it’s modeled after the starfighter most commonly recognized from the Battle of Yavin in Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope.

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Top 7 Most Popular Boot Knives

When things get rough or situations are unknown, there’s nothing more comfortable than knowing you’ve got a back-up plan tucked away in your steel-toe boots.

Boot knives can be used for everything, from survival situations to last resort self-defense. Since they’re often concealed and frequently feature dual-edged blades, you should check with your local laws to see whether there are any restrictions.

But if you’re looking to pick up a new boot knife, these seven are among the best on the market.

CRKT Sting

Forged from one solid piece of steel, the Sting is a knife from the great A.G. Russell that features a simple but effective design as reliable as when it was first introduced in the 1970s. The overall length is just under 7 inches with a roughly 3.2-inch dual-edge blade. The blade and handle are made of 1050 carbon steel coated with a black powder finish.

A good sheath is essential in a boot knife, and the Sting delivers on that end. It comes with a custom nylon-stitched sheath with a glass reinforced nylon insert. Russell updated the design not long ago with the Sting 3B, but the original remains one of the best.

Smith & Wesson SWHRT9B H.R.T. Boot Knife

There are three boot knives on this list with nearly identical designs as the Smith & Wesson SWHRT9B H.R.T. Boot Knife, but we’ve received nothing but praises about the knife. This is one of the best-selling knives at Knife Depot. As I’ve written before, the knife is the perfect choice for a last-ditch weapon when things get rough.

A 4.74-inch double-edged blade is made from 7Cr17 high carbon stainless steel and coated with black Teflon. Its shapely handle is wrapped in black rubber while the grooved rings provide extra grip when holding the knife.

The leather sheath holds the knife in place with snap fastener.

Cold Steel Kobun

The Cold Steel Kobun is less of a dedicated boot knife than the others but it is more than capable of hanging around on your boot in wait of some action. At 4.4 ounces, the Kobun weighs less than the S&W boot knife with a longer blade. The 5.5-inch blade is made from Japanese AUS 8A stainless steel and features the American-style tanto blade that offers a durable design. It’s definitely on the larger end of a boot knife.

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Top 15 Left-Handed EDC Knives

Only about 10 percent of people are left-handed.

That means the vast majority of items and tools are made with right-handers in mind. Lefties have to put up with right-handed scissors, right-handed can openers, right-handed desks, etc. While the left-handed industry has grown over the years (they make left-handed everything nowadays like scissors and reverse spiral-bound notebooks), finding the same quality that right-handers are afforded is hard.

But it is not hopeless for left-handers. Right, Ned?

Fortunately, for all you lefties out there, some knifemakers are sensitive to your plight and have created truly ambidextrous knife designs. If you’re tired trying to adjusts to right-handed knives with their annoying liner locks, these 10 knives are great EDC options for left-handers.

1. Gerber Gator Knife

Gerber Gator Knife

Gerber gets much maligned by knife experts for a number of reasons, including some that are well-deserved, but when they do something right, they do it really right. The Gerber Gator is the perfect example. This knife is a staple of the Gerber line and is made in the United States with quality materials.

The clip point blade is 420HC stainless steel and the textured handle is glass-filled nylon. You can grab the drop point in 154CM steel if your heart desires. But the real left-handed feature on the knife is the lock back mechanism (which is more specifically a mid lock). This mechanism can be used effectively with either hand.

There’s also no thumb studs or nail nicks on either side which means you can open it up by pinching the blade with either hand. Finally, a lack of clip won’t give you anxiety about which direction it should face.

2. Benchmade Griptilian Knife

Benchmade Griptilian Knife

If you want a truly ambidextrous knife, look no further than Benchmade. Essentially every knife in the lineup works seamlessly with the left hand thanks to the AXIS locking mechanism.

Here is the great Doug Ritter singing the AXIS lock’s praises on his site:

Operationally, the lock can be, and is in all the knives produced so far, completely ambidextrous since the locking bar extends through both side plates. While the lockback is also ambidextrous, the liner lock is not, and with few exceptions, southpaws have been left out in the cold when it comes to liner lock knives.

Because pretty much all Benchmade knives could be on this list, I narrowed it down to the two that are among the best EDC knives ever. The first to make the appearance is the Benchmade Griptilian.

There’s something about the design of the knife that makes it so darn functional and appealing. The originals featured an exceptionally grippy nylon handle with a 154CM blade. For those of us in regions with restrictions, the Mini Griptilian has a blade that comes in at less than 3 inches.

Then, of course, there’s the recently upgraded premium version of the knife with G10 handle scales, blue anodized titanium spacers, and premium CPM-20CV steel. Plus, the knife comes in all types of colors and black or satin blade coating.

There’s a Griptilian for every personality.

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3. Al Mar Ultralight Eagle Knife

Al Mar Ultralight Eagle

Al Mar is a legend in the knife community and the brand’s bird of prey line (Eagle, Falcon, and Hawk) are among the best EDC knives around. They’re a bit on the pricey end, but the Ultralight versions weighing in at less than 3 ounces are worth the price.

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10 Best EDC Fixed Blade Knives

Morakniv Fixed Blade

We all know that folding knives make the best knives for EDC — they’re often lightweight, easily concealable, versatile and can be folded up into the pocket.

However, a small but growing number of people are ditching folders for fixed blades as their EDC knives. Why? A fixed blade can be more reliable, stronger, and a bevy of new designs means it can be just as compact and lightweight as a pocket knife.

If you’re thinking about starting to carry a fixed blade as an EDC in lieu of a folder, here are 10 of the best EDC fixed blade knives to start with. I may update it in the future with a list of 20 since I left off many good ones. (You can also check out our list of the top small fixed blade knives)

ESEE Izula Fixed Blade Knife

Izula Fixed Blade Thrower

Let’s kick things off with one of the most popular EDC fixed blades around: the ESEE Izula. There’s something about the small US-made neck knife that’s won over so many fans. The blade is a mere 2.63 inches  with a versatile drop point blade design. The handle on the basic version is untouched, leaving users the option for customization. But you can also pick up some Micarta scales if you desire.

While I opted to put the Izula here, other ESEE knives warrant a look for EDC, including the Izula II and the Candiru.

Buck 113 Ranger Fixed Blade Skinner

Buck 113 Ranger Fixed Blade Knife

The Buck 113 Ranger Skinner is a classic fixed blade if there ever was one. The knife is a melding of the 112 Ranger and the 192 Vanguard with a slimmer and more streamlined design. The blade is 3.125 inches and made with 420HC stainless steel while the handle is walnut with brass bolsters and pins. It features a classic look that’s disarming and handsome.

KA-BAR BK11 Becker Necker Fixed Blade Knife

KA-BAR BK11 Becker Necker

Like ESEE, I only wanted to include one KA-BAR Becker knife because there are so many good options. I decided to go with the BK11 Becker Necker but it was neck and neck (pardon the pun) with the BK14 Eskabar. Both knives have the same 3.25-inch drop point blades made from 1095 CroVan steel but converge with the handle.

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Father & Son Knifemakers

My son is only two years old, but I’m already looking forward to all things I’ll teach him about my trade. Unfortunately, the things I work with aren’t necessarily cool. Sure, blogging and the occasional graphic design is fun, but it’s not nearly as badass as making knives.

A select few fathers and sons have traded thoughts and ideas surrounding knives, and some have even collaborated on designs.

Since it’s the time of year when fathers and sons get together, we decided to take a look at the father and son duos in the knife world. Let us know in the comments if we made any glaring omissions.

Michael and Baltazar E. Martinez

michaelmartinezandhisfather2_fullMichael, along with his father Baltazar, invented a number of items over the years, but what they’re best known for is the CRKT Ultima Fixed Blade. Michael Martinez is a sculptor, inventor, and martial artist who helped reinvent the fixed blade with the Ultima.

Here’s what Michael said at the CRKT site: “In my edged weapons training, I kept noticing how many knives didn’t feel right, didn’t have a grip that gave both control and comfort in the four fundamental tactical grips.”

His father, who was a mechanical engineer working on classified nuclear system design for the defense department for more than 30 years, contributed to the project by injecting his own design into the knife.

The result was a knife that achieved 22 out of 23 ideal contact points with its comfortable handle. Even though this father and son duo is mainly known for designing this one knife, they definitely deserve some recognition.

Sal & Eric Glesser

Few knife makers have brought such innovation and legitimacy to the knife world like the legendary Sal Glesser. Sal—the founder of Spyderco—not only pioneered features like the pocket clip, serrations, and ambidextrous opening hole but he’s also a very down to earth guy. You can find him frequenting knife forums and answering people’s questions with honesty and modesty. He designed the Delica, Endura, Military, Persistence, and many others.

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Best Knives to Give to Your Dad on Father’s Day

When you think back to your first knife, it’s likely that your dad was the person who gave it to you. So, to honor your dad with the same special gift he bestowed upon you, consider getting him a brand new knife for Father’s Day this weekend.

This post originally appeared way back in 2012, but we’re updating it to add even more knives and replace some older models.

Victorinox One-Hand Trekker

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The Swiss Army knife is usually the first knife a father gives his son. Add a twist to the classic dynamic by giving your dad a brand new model with some advancements from the model he is probably used to. The One-Hand Trekker has many of the same features as the classic models, but it comes with an ergonomic handle, a more modern look, and a blade that locks open.

Buck 110 Hunting Pocket Knife

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Fewer brands exhibit class and quality like Buck Knives. Show your dad that you’re no slouch when it comes to picking character over value by giving him Buck’s signature knife the Folding Hunter. The knife features a woodgrain handle and a classic lockback system and is widely recognized as one of the most iconic knives of all time.

Benchmade 940-1 Osborne

If you want to splurge a little on your dad and get him something that’s known for quality and craftsmanship, opt for the Benchmade 940-1. This is the premium version of the renowned 940, with some upgrades like S90V steel and carbon fiber handle scales. Other little flourishes like blue anodized titanium back spacers set this quintessential EDC apart from the rest.

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10 Knives You Can Pry With

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We’ve heard it a million times. A knife should never ever be used for prying. If there were a 10 Commandments of Knives, “Thou shalt not pry with your knife” would be number one.

So why do so many people insist on using their knives to pry open cans or boxes when they know it could result in this? We usually have a knife on us and it’s just so convenient.

Fortunately, for every problems, there is a solution. You could simply not pry (but what’s the fun in that?), buy a separate mini pry bar, or pick up a knife that’s built to pry.

Unless you want to carry yet another tool as part of your EDC, I’d opt for a pry bar knife.

If you think pry knives don’t exist, you’re missing out on a whole world of possibilities. Here’s a list of 10 knives with pry bars.

1. KA-BAR BK3 Becker Tac Tool

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For all intents and purpose, the BK3 Tac Tool is a sharpened pry bar. This collaboration between Ethan Becker of Becker Knife & Tool and John Benner of Tactical Defense Institute features a wicked 7-inch blade with a blunt tip and a flat, one-sided grind. It has partial serrations on the edge and a hook cutter on the spine.

This blade is 0.250 inches thick and can be used for prying, hammering, cutting, and smashing. This knife is designed to take a beating, which is why you don’t have to feel guilty when you use it to pry open a door.

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2. Boker Pry-Mate

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Next up is a knife with a punny name: the Boker Pry-Mate. This robust knife is designed with an eye toward prying. The blade is nearly 7mm thick—thicker than the Tac Tool—but only 3.38 inches long. The blade is made from N690BO stainless steel. This is an Austrian steel made especially for Boker with a focus on performance and durability. That’s a must if you’re going to be using it to pry lids off paint cans.

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10 Knives with Bottle Openers

It’s been a long day. You finally made it down to the lake to have a few beers with your buddies. You’re ready to throw back a cold one when you realize no one has a bottle opener.

Sure, there are ways to open bottles without a dedicated opener, but using a bottle opener is quick, easy, and so satisfying.

To ensure you’re always ready for a good time, many knives feature a bottle opener. We’ve assembled a collection of some of the best.

1. Kershaw Shuffle

kershaw-shuffle

First up is the Kershaw Shuffle. This inexpensive folder has a dedicated opener built into the back of the knife. Its blade is 2.38 inches and made from 8Cr13MoV stainless steel. The Shuffle comes in a variety of colors to match up with your personality. This little knife is beloved by knife lovers of all types and acts as a great EDC.

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2. DPx Gear HEST

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The DPx Gear HEST is another great option. This fixed blade has a 3.13-inch blade and green canvas Micarta handle scales. The blade is 1095 high carbon steel, and a notch on the spine of the blade acts as a bottle opener.

As a matter of fact, a number of DPx Gear knives feature bottle openers. Unlike the HEST, the HEFT 4 Assault has a bottle opener built into the butt of the knife. It’s a fixed blade with an extended tang and G10 handle scales.

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3. Gerber Epic

gerber-epic

The Epic from Gerber is another fixed blade knife, only this one has a bottle opener integrated right into the handle. The blade is 3.45 inches long, and the knife itself is 7.3 inches long. The bottle opener actually gives the knife a little more length and a place for the back of your palm. It fits into a nylon sheath.

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4. Buck Metro

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More similar to a keychain tool than a fixed blade, the Buck Metro is a compact tool with a small blade and bottle opener.

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