The Cutting Edge

The official blog of Knife Depot

Author: Tim (page 2 of 52)

Timothy Martinez Jr. is the community director for Knife Depot and the editor of The Cutting Edge. If you have any questions or ideas for The Cutting Edge, you can contact him at Tim@knife-depot.com.

15 Bright Green Knives

It’s an old tradition to wear something green on St. Patrick’s Day. Some people wear green shoelaces or a green hat, but if you’re the kind of knife nut who’s reading this blog, you’re probably going to carry a green knife.

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we’re looking at 20 great knives with green handles.

This article has been updated a few times since its first publication in 2014 to get rid of discontinued models and put some new ones.

Spyderco Dragonfly 2, British Racing Green

The Dragonfly 2 is a truly amazing knife. It is small yet versatile, efficient yet sexy. The black version is already excellent, but the Spyderco Dragonfly 2 in British Racing Green takes things to the next level.

The blade is made from ZDP-189 and features dark green FRN handles. When folks in the knife community call this one of the best EDC knives ever, you know you have a winner.

Artisan Ravine, Green

Artisan Cutlery is an up-and-coming brand with a lot of new and exciting designs. Each comes in a variety of options and materials. The Ravine is a great little design with a modified Wharncliffe blade and ergonomic handle. This version has a D2 blade and green G-10 handle scales.

Other Artisan Cutlery knives come in mint green as well.

Bear & Son Cutlery Undead Bear Tac II

The Bear & Son Cutlery Undead Bear Tac II is a green knife through and through. It features zombie green G-10 handle scales and a zombie green blade made from 1095 carbon steel.

Buck Spitfire, Green Aluminum Handle

The Spitfire from Buck is a versatile folder that will easily become your new EDC the moment you hold it. This beauty is made in the USA and features a thin design. You can choose the color it comes in, but the one we’re concerned with is this brownish Aluminum Green handle.

Electrifying California OTF

California legal OTF knives are becoming increasingly popular. These little out the front automatic knives have blades under two inches. Even though it’s small, it still works like a charm for most EDC tasks.

Continue reading

15 Best Keychain Tools

Quick, empty your pockets.

If you happen to be outside the house, you’ll likely have at least three items: a wallet, phone, and keys. We’ve already talked about credit-card knives that fit into wallets and the iPhone multitool case, but that leaves us with keys.

Since your keys are always within reach whenever you’re outside the house, they’re a natural place to attach essential tools.

If you’re looking to make your keys even more useful, we’ve assembled this list of tools that fit right on your keychain.

Some of the tools we first wrote about when this was published in May 2015 have gone the way of the dodo, so we decided to give this list an update.

Gerber Shard

The Gerber Shard is a small and easy to carry piece of steel that doesn’t overwhelm with functions. The small tool has two screwdrivers, a pry bar, a nail remover, a bottle and can opener, a scraper, and whatever else you can get out of it.

The tool is 2.75 inches long and made of stainless steel with black titanium coating.

Victorinox Classic SD

Perhaps the best-known multitool ever is the Swiss Army knife. The Victorinox Classic SD is not only one of the best-selling Swiss Army knives but it is also small enough to fit on your keychain.

Continue reading

Modern EDC Slipjoints

If you don’t have a tactical folder that can hold the weight of a car, do you really have a functional knife?

Yes! The truth is for countless years people have successfully used nonlocking folders for all kinds of jobs. In fact, in more recent years, companies have started making slipjoint knives you can carry as an EDC folder.

While these knives aren’t something you’d want to baton with (get a fixed blade for that unless you’re Advanced Knife Bro), nonlocking folders are a great option for an EDC. You don’t have to settle for an old Case knife either (not that there’s anything wrong with that). You can now get a modern-looking slipjoint that uses higher end materials.

Here are some of the best modern EDC slipjoints currently available.

Byrd Tern

Unfortunately, Spyderco recently did away with many of its best slipjoint models — such as the Pingo and the PITS. OK, so the PITS isn’t really a slipjoint, but it’s still a nonlocking folder. However, the sub brand of Spyderco called Byrd Knives has an inexpensive slipjoint called the Tern that features a modern look.

The knife is essentially a cheaper version of the UK Penknife.

CRKT ARt Deco

There was one point a few years back where CRKT had a few modern EDC slip joints to choose from. However, they’re not always as popular as locking knives. Fortunately, for just a little longer we have the Art Deco folder from Ken Steigerwalt.

Boker Plus Wasabi

Boker is probably the brand with the most modern EDC slipjoints, as you’ll see farther down the list. One of the best and newest is the Wasabi, an interesting design from Kansei Matsuno.

Continue reading

15 Best Lightweight Fixed Blade Knives

The old saying goes that the best lock mechanism on a knife is a fixed blade.

Back in the day, fixed blades were mostly robust outdoor tools, but the trend has been increasingly toward lighter and lighter fixed blades. That’s a plus for everyone.

A few years back, I wrote a post on the best EDC fixed blade knives. While all the knives performed well at EDC tasks, many of them were quite hefty.

So I decided to take the concept of an EDC fixed blade and narrow it down even more to the best lightweight fixed blades. All of these knives are at least under 3 ounces — with many of them being under 2.

Check them out.

CRKT Minimalist Wharncliffe

Weight: 1.1 oz
Blade Length: 2″
Overall Length: 5″

OK, I know my love for the CRKT Minimalist permeates everything around here, as this model makes it onto many best-of lists (including the aforementioned best EDC fixed blades). But it deserves another mention here. In the best EDC fixed blades post, I highlighted the Bowie version, but the Wharncliffe version is even lighter at a mere 1.1 ounces.

This is one of those knives you can feel confident carrying anywhere you go and feels big in the hand, despite the — well — minimalist handle.

Spyderco ARK

Weight: 0.9 oz
Blade Length: 2.56″
Overall Length: 4.98″

A Spyderco made it on the best EDC fixed blades, but the Street Beat is a pretty heavy folder. Enter the Spyderco ARK. Standing for “Always Ready Knife,” the ARK was designed as a personal defense knife by U.S. Army combat veteran John Shirley and his friend Sam Owens.

Continue reading

Best Ontario Knives

Over the past year or so, I’ve been going over the best knives from each brand. Some have been really easy to narrow down such as Spyderco and Kershaw.

However, few brands have been harder to pin down than Ontario Knife Company. Ontario, sometimes known more simply as OKC, has a surprisingly robust and diverse selection of knives that all serve a purpose and do it well. There are some obvious choices — ahem, the RAT folders — but there are so many other serviceable knives that could have been on this list.

These lists always carry some level of bias and subjectivity, but I feel like this list may contain more whimsy and randomness than others.

If I’m alive and kicking and still have this job, I’ll redo this next year and may swap out some others, but this is the list for 2019. Let me know which ones I missed in the comments.

Ontario RAT Folder

Let’s start with the easiest addition to this list: the RAT Folders. I’m cheating a bit because this includes the RAT 1 and RAT 2 folders. They are essentially the same knife but in different sizes.

The RAT folders are a perennial favorite among knife people because they are relatively cheap, reliable, and solid knives. The fact that they are now available in D2 at a low cost means they may be the best budget knife on the market.

Along with D2, you can get an assisted version, an AUS 8 version, and some with different blade finishes and handle colors.

Ontario Black Bird SK-5

The next no-brainer is the Ontario Black Bird SK-5. The series is designed by Paul Scheiter. The survival knife was named the best of the best by Field and Stream Magazine in 2011. It’s a pretty simple bushcrafting knife with a 5-inch 154CM stainless steel blade and G-10 handle scales.

Continue reading

2020 Discontinued Spyderco Knives

With a new year comes new cuts to old favorites. Spyderco announced which knives were getting the ax back in September on their forum.

While that’s bad news for those who loved the knives, there is still some good news to be had. Most of these knives are still available but only for a little longer.

To help you, we’ve assembled the list of about 30 discontinued knives with links to where you can buy them. Then later in the post, we’ll talk about which models we’ll miss the most.

All 2020 Discontinued Spyderco Knives

BY03TIP2 – Cara Cara 2 Titanium (Sold Out)
BY04TIP2 – Meadowlark 2 Titanium (Sold Out)
BY10TIP2 – Robin 2 Titanium (Sold Out)
C07GP4 – Police 4 G-10
C28S – Dragonfly Stainless SPY
C28SBK2 – Dragonfly 2 Black SPY
C69GP3 – Lil’ Temperance 3 G-10
C82GP3 – D’Allara 3
C91SYL – Pacific Salt Yellow SPY (Look for the Pacific Salt 2 in 2020)
C91PYL – Pacific Salt Yellow PLN (Look for the Pacific Salt 2 in 2020)
C91SBK – Pacific Salt Black SPY (Look for the Pacific Salt 2 in 2020)
C91PBK – Pacific Salt Black PLN (Look for the Pacific Salt 2 in 2020)
C91PBBK – Pacific Salt Black Blade PLN (Look for the Pacific Salt 2 in 2020)
C91SBBK – Pacific Salt Black Blade SPY (Look for the Pacific Salt 2 in 2020)
C123CFP – Sage 1 Carbon Fiber
C152STIBLP – Chaparral Blue Stepped Ti
C152STIP – Chaparral Stepped Ti (Out)
C170GP – Karahawk G-10 Satin (Out)
C193PGY – Squarehead Lightweight Gray
C193PBK – Squarehead Lightweight Black
C203TIP – Mantra 2 Titanium
C212CFP – Magnitude Carbon Fiber
C214TIP – Advocate Titanium
C218GP – Opus G-10
C219GP – Q-Ball G-10
C224GP – Lil’ Sub-Hilt G-10
C225GP – Hundred Pacer
C227GP – Hanan G-10
FB38GP – Junction
K11S – Cooks Knife SPY

Spyderco Sage 1

The Sage series is a great idea — taking a great design and making it with different lock mechanisms. Unfortunately, many in the Sage series have been discontinued, including the Sage 1 with a liner lock this year.

Continue reading

Top 20 Knives with D2 Steel

This post was updated in December 2019 to include newer models.

Finding the perfect steel is tough. Not only are there so many types available but there are also tons of factors to consider — price, ease of sharpening, hardness, corrosion resistance, and more.

The perfect steel is ever elusive, but you can pick the right steel for the job. If you want a steel that’s nearly stainless but has great edge retention and wear-resistance, opt for D2.

D2 tool steel has been around for a very long time. It became popular as a tool steel during World War II in factories. In terms of knives, knife makers Wayne Goddard and Bob Dozier pioneered the use of D2 steel in knives. In fact, Dozier is sometimes called Dr. D2.

Here is an excerpt from Steve Shackleford’s Blade Magazine post on why D2 is still so great after all these years:

While D2 may not be stainless, it remains a top performer due in no small part to its high wear resistance/edge-holding ability. “It will hold an edge for a very long time before it will go dull,” says Paul Tsujimoto, director of engineering at Ontario Knife Co.  Combined with its relatively inexpensive price, this makes D2 a favorite of manufacturers and custom makers alike. “For us, it’s the perfect combination of performance and an affordable price,” notes Dietmar Pohl of Pohl Force Knives. Agrees Devanna, “It’s the best bang for the buck because it’s priced reasonably and works well.”

While D2 does sacrifice ease of sharpening and some corrosion resistance, it remains an excellent choice for knife users everywhere.

If you’re interested in seeing what D2 has to offer, I collected a list of 20 knives that showcase the variety of D2 knives. Take a look.

1. Ontario RAT 1 D2

The RAT 1 is one of the most beloved budget knives of all time. It (and its smaller brother the RAT 2) are praised for their designs and overall utility. The only major complaint the RAT 1 gets is its adequate AUS-8 blade steel. So Ontario Knife Company came back with a D2 version of the knife.

The one I’m highlighting here is an all-around fantastic limited edition version with a D2 blade and a carbon fiber laminated G-10 handle. It doesn’t cut down on the weight as much as I’d like, but it looks and feels great in the hand. Other than the upgrades, the limited edition RAT 1 maintains the same design elements as the original.

2. Benchmade Adamas

“This knife is a tank.” I’ve heard that about the Benchmade Adamas a million times, and it’s not hard to see why the folding version gets so much love. The 3.82-inch blade is 0.160 inches thick while the handle features liners and G-10 handle scales. Coming in at more than 7 ounces, the weight would be a liability in a lesser knife but the Adamas uses it as leverage in heavy-duty tasks.

Continue reading

How To Choose The Best Pocket Knife For You: A First-Time Buyer's Guide

Buying your first pocket knife?

Purchasing one can seem intimidating if it’s your first time. Some people assume pocket knives are all the same but they’re not! There are so many factors to consider if you want to buy the best pocket knife for your specific needs.

Take a deep breath; we’re here to help you out. Check out our guide below for 8 crucial steps to get the best folding knife:

1. How Many Blades?

One of the first things you have to figure out is whether you want one blade, two, or more. This decision heavily alters all other factors and this is why we’re looking at it first.

A knife with a single blade gives you optimal functionality but for one purpose. You’ll get a dedicated carving knife, a dedicated hunting knife, and so on.

Getting multiple blades works the other way around. Swiss knives a Jack-of-All-Trades deal. They’re good at multiple tasks but none of the blades are strong enough to be your ideal choice.

If you’re out hunting, a single blade is all you need. If you need a knife for odd repairs, then a Swiss knife with different blades and small tools is a better fit.

2. Carrying It Around

Decided whether you want a single blade or a multi-blade knife? Congratulations, now you have to figure out how to carry it.

Take a moment to read pocketknife reviews and videos before buying. Look for any indications of how the knife locks to your pocket or belt.

Smaller pocket knives often don’t come with clips but they’re easy to slide loosely into your pocket. Larger knives use clips and this ensures they don’t weigh down on your pockets. The best pocket knife should satisfy both aesthetics and comfort demands so consider which carrying style suits your tastes.

3. Open and Lock Systems

These are some of the most important aspects to consider. When you buy pocket knife products, take time to first learn the legalities of the opening system in your area.

Some places, like in the UK, don’t allow people to carry a fully-automatic system. In the US, it differs from state to state.

There are three main types: manual open, automatic open, and semi-automatic open.

Manual knives are the old-fashioned designs in which you have to pull the blade out of the fold, requiring two hands. Semi-automatics require you to pull the blade out a bit before it pops out. Automatic open simply require a button press to open the blade and lock it steadily in place.

Also, consider the locking system too. Frame locks, liner locks, and lock-backs determine you can use the knife with one hand or two.

4. Blade Size

If this is your first pocket knife, don’t forget to look at the length of the blade too. Smaller blades are great for light tasks and are likely legal anywhere you go. Medium to large blades are heavier and you may run into legal issues depending on local laws regarding weapons and dangerous tools.

The blade’s length also determines the kind of work it can tackle. Smaller blades are great for tasks in tight spaces and those that need a fragile touch. Larger blades won’t work well for those cases but they’re the better choice for heavy-duty work.

5. Knife Material

When it comes to materials and build of the blade, it boils down to two main options: carbon and stainless steel. There are also high-carbon stainless steel knives and alloys of different mixtures.

Carbon and stainless steel reign supreme due to their durability. To determine a knife’s hardness, ask for its HRC rating. HRC refers to the Rockwell C scale and many consider it more accurate compared to the Mohs scale, which measures resistance.

There is one thing to take note: if you find a pocket knife built from alloy steel, look for a specific list of the metals used. If the knife simply states “stainless steel” with no HRC rating or popular brand, don’t buy it.

6. The Knife Edge

Do you need to cut rope or something similarly tough? Get a pocket knife with a serrated edge. If you need a pocket knife for smooth slicing or push cutting, get a knife with a plain edge.

If you’re not sure or if you might need both edges, get a pocket knife that has both. Some hunting knives have a plain edge along the upper half, close to the tip, and a serrated edge closer to the handle.

7. The Knife Handle

A good edge and a quick open/lock system won’t do you good if the handle isn’t up to standards. Consider the size of the handle with your hands and look around for something with an ergonomic design as this guarantees a comfortable grip.

You should also consider the handle materials.

Bone and wood are the classic choices but you can find pocket knives that use plastic capable of emulating their style and feel. Composite materials and metal are available too and these offer a more contemporary look.

The design matters too. Karambit pocket knives, which originated from the Philippines and Indonesia, have a large loop so you can lock your thumb or small finger. This ensures people can’t slap it off your hand.

Other designs focus on multi-tasking convenience or durability.

8. Price Matters

Now you have to look at pocket knives that fit the previous seven categories and your budget.

How much are pocket knives? Fortunately, pocket knives come in a wide assortment of price ranges, meaning you’re bound to find something that fits your needs and budget. You can find something below $25 and some that go over $100.

Get the Best Pocket Knife Today!

It’s easy to find the best pocket knife once you go through this list and narrow down exactly what you want. The next step is to look for knives that fit all these criteria.

The good news is you’re in luck. We have a wide selection of pocket knives. If you’re having trouble finding what you need, don’t hesitate to message us and let us help you sort things out. https://credit-n.ru/order/zaim-ryabina.html

'Most Innovative American-Made Design of the Year' Winners at Blade Show Since 1990

Every year, the finest knifemakers and manufacturers descend on Atlanta to reveal new knife models, talk shop, and receive awards at the Blade Show.

I’ve already delved deep into the past and laid out the “Overall Knife of the Year” winners since Blade Show first started in 1982.

In advance of the latest Blade Show, I thought I’d take a look back at a different category: the Most Innovative American-Made Design of the Year. This category (and its counterpart Most Innovative Imported Design of the Year) didn’t start until 1990, so that’s where we’ll pick up.

It gives a good insight into the thinking of the judges who pick the knives and whether any of these stood to the test of time (hint: many did!).

1990: Becker Knife & Tool Tactul II

The image features early Tactuls or possibly Divtuls — not sure which models or generations.

We’re starting with the very first entry in 1990: the Becker Knife & Tool Tactul II. These earlier knives are hard to nail down because they have evolved or gone the way of the dodo. You might not be familiar with the Tactul II, but you might know the modern day version better known as the KA-BAR Becker Tac Tool.

Before teaming up with KA-BAR, Ethan Becker had his own company who put out knives made by other manufacturers. The original description from Blade Magazine on the win says the knife is a “heavy duty diving/utility knife that is a saw, hammer/nail puller, screwdriver, chisel, pry bar and knife all in one.”

1991: Gerber Gator Serrated

A more recent version of the Gator.

The Gerber Gator feels like old news now but it was once one of the most innovative when first released. The overall design with the gator-like textured handle was superb. In fact, this — like the Tac Tool — remains a very good knife that’s still around.

1992: Equip USA El Diente

Image provided by Blade Magazine

I wasn’t able to find any information about the Equip USA El Diente, so I reached out to Blade Magazine (which sponsors the Blade Show) to find out more.

Continue reading

15 Wood Handle EDC Knives

Article originally published in February 2018 before being updated to include different knives.

Picking the handle material that appeals to you the most depends on a ton of factors, including looks, purpose, durability, and more.

If you want something that’s durable and won’t warp, opt for a synthetic material. If you want something that’s probably the first handle material ever, go for bone. If you want something sleek and strong, pick a knife with a metal handle.

But, if you want a knife that’s downright good-looking and feels good in the handle, it’s hard to beat good old-fashioned wood.

Pros and Cons of Wood

I won’t go until detail about the pros and cons of wood because you probably already know, so I’ll boil it down. The Good: Comfortable, beautiful, varied, durable, potentially inexpensive. The Bad: Unstable at times, prone to warpage, requires more maintenance, potentially expensive.

The fact that there are so many types of wood out there means you can get the look and durability you desire while maintaining that natural looks.

There are some stabilized laminates on par with plywood in this list, including Dymondwood. If that doesn’t jibe with you, then I apologize in advance.

Without further ado, here’s a look at 15 excellent folding knives with wooden handles.

1. Boker Magnum Backpacker (Soft Wood)

I wanted to start off with the Backpacker. This is a really handsome knife with a simple yet solid construction. It has a 3.4-inch drop point blade made from 440 stainless steel. It opens via a thumb stud and locks with a liner.

Continue reading

10 Best Cold Steel Knives

This article was originally published in July 2018 before being updated with newer models.

We’re continuing our run-through of the best knives from each brand. Narrowing down the 10 best currently in production is no easy task, but I did the best I could using personal experience, consensus around the internet, reviews, and more.

Here are the 10 best Cold Steel knives.

Cold Steel Recon 1

Let’s start with a gimme: the Cold Steel Recon 1. The Recon series helped usher in a new era for Cold Steel, one that is currently dominated by tough knives with a tactical bent that use Andrew Demko’s famous Tri-Ad locking mechanism.

The Recon 1 uses high quality material with a 4-inch blade made from S35VN steel (recently changed from CTS-XHP). The handle is a grippy G-10.

One of the great things about this flagship model is that it comes in tons of sizes and blade shapes, so you can get exactly what you want.

Cold Steel Ti-Lite

Reminiscent of the switchblades of the 1950s, the Cold Steel Ti-Lite is a thin yet lengthy folder with an eye on self-defense. There’s a 4-inch or 6-inch version — both come in either budget or premium builds.

Continue reading

Kershaw Natrix – Badass Knife of the Week

In 2011, Kershaw and Zero Tolerance created a highly ambitious knife that pushed the envelope — a knife called the ZT 0777. Difficulties in production and issues with availability in materials caused the knife to see a very limited run.

Six years later, Kershaw created a budget-friendly iteration of the original that’s smaller and more economical while retaining many of the design features that captured the attention of the knife community.

That knife is the Badass Knife of the Week.

View this post on Instagram

#KershawNatrix #KershawKnives #Usnstagram

A post shared by Trevor Havens (@genkraid) on

The Kershaw Natrix (model number 7007) is the company’s attempt to reclaim the design from others who created homages to the original ZT design.

Continue reading

Benchmade Infidel – Badass Knife of the Week

If you could only choose one OTF automatic knife for your collection, reach for the Benchmade Infidel.

The Infidel is the flagship out-the-front model from the iconic butterfly brand and has been a mainstay of its lineup for years.

Designed by the great McHenry & Williams — who also created the AXIS lock — the Infidel is an entirely different beast than other Benchmade offerings. The dagger-style blade stretches 3.91 inches with a blood groove down the center. While the D2 steel of the blade is not considered a modern supersteel, D2 remains one of the most popular choices for durable and long-lasting edges.

But the real allure of this knife is the deployment method. With the push of the thumb slider, the blade engages lightning fast. Unlike some of the more budget OTF options, this knife also disengages by pulling the thumb slider back down. The hypnotic action of opening and closing this knife will keep you occupied for countless hours.

Continue reading

Victorinox Rambler – Badass Knife of the Week

While it’s the biggest and baddest knives that get all the attention, it’s the small, industrious knives that do most of the work.

The Victorinox Rambler is the perfect example. This small Swiss Army Knife is the same size as the world famous Classic SD model when closed. However, it packs 10 different functions into the diminutive design.

Because knife is in the name, we thought we’d start there. It has a small pen blade that gets the job done for small tasks and can become razor sharp easily. Another fan favorite is the scissors, which can be used for everything from trimming stray hairs to getting off plastic tags.

Continue reading

Spyderco Paramilitary 2 S110V – Badass Knife of the Week

Even after all these years, when you ask for recommendations on the best everyday carry knife, the Spyderco Paramilitary 2 will undoubtedly be the top choice. The PM2 has been a previous Badass Knife of the Week, but in honor of the week we celebrate the country’s independence, we decided to run back the PM2 with the upgraded S110V blade and Blurple handles.

The Spyderco Paramilitary 2 remains the go-to choice for best EDC knife with its nearly flawless design. So what could be better than a PM2? A PM2 with upgraded steel and sexy handle scales.

This version of the popular folder features all the same assets we’ve come to love and respect in the original. The 3.42-inch blade has an excellent slicing belly and piercing point. It opens with the iconic RoundHole and locks into place with the Compression Lock. Not only is the lock reliable and safer than something like a liner lock but it makes opening and closing the blade almost hypnotic.

Continue reading

10 Folding Knives Designed For Self-Defense

self-defense-folding-knife

This post was originally published October 14, 2016, and updated June 28, 2019, to include more current knives.

Using a knife for self-defense is a bad idea.

Let me get that out of the way. By writing this post, I’m getting into pretty controversial territory. Many people, both trained and amateurs, insist that a knife should never be used for self-defense unless you’ve undergone intensive training. Even so, you might want to avoid whipping out a knife at all costs.

A knife is messy and requires you to get extremely close to your aggressor, making you more vulnerable and giving them the ability to take your weapon away. Knife defense can be fatal to your aggressor, leaving you with potential jail time and a traumatic experience haunting your dreams.

On top of that, folding knives often don’t make the best self-defense tools anyway because they are more susceptible to breakage and require more focus for engagement.

But all this doesn’t stop companies from making self-defense knives.

Any knife can conceivably be used for self-defense. As long as it’s sharp, you can do some damage, but these are created with one purpose in mind. Sure, you could possibly use a few of these to open packages, but these not something you’d carry for everyday use.

So with all the disclaimers out of the way and with the knowledge that self-defense knives may not always be the best idea unless you’re in a dire situation with your life on the line (of if you’re being attacked by a rabid dog), here are 10 folding knives designed specifically for self-defense.

1. Cold Steel Ti-Lite 6″

cold-steel-ti-lite

Let’s kick things off with the first of many Cold Steel knives on this list: the Cold Steel Ti-Lite. The Ti-Lite is a throwback design that’s meant to look like the switchblades prevalent in the 1950s. The knife has a long spear-point blade profile that’s optimal for piercing.

It comes in a few sizes, but the one we’re talking about here is the Ti-Lite 6, which features a massive 6-inch blade. At this size, the knife is not good for much else except for self-defense. It might even be too big.

However, the Ti-Lite has a big feature seen in many of these knives—the ability to open in one swift movement out of the pocket. The quillon can snag the pocket as it’s being pulled out before the blade is locked in place. This knife can be out and ready to intimidate in a moment’s notice.

buy-button2

2. Fox Folding Karambit

Next up on this list is the Fox Folding Karambit.

The truth is that all karambits can be on this list since karambits are ancient defensive tools. They aren’t the most useful tools for things other than self-defense. However, this one has a few tricks up its sleeve.

Continue reading

Boker Plus Rhino – Badass Knife of the Week

Danish knifemaker Jesper Voxnaes has risen to the top of the standings as one of the best knife designers around, creating knives that are functional and understated.

The Boker Plus Rhino is yet another example of Voxnaes’ eye for comfort and purpose in outdoor-focused knives.

The Rhino is on the smaller size of a hunting and outdoor knife with a 3-inch blade, but the knife packs a lot of punch. The 440C stainless steel blade has a curved cutting edge and upswept point for multiple applications, such as skinning game and setting up campsites.

Contoured G-10 handle scales cover the tang of the fixed blade and allow enough purchase for three to four fingers, depending on your hand size. The texturing on the G-10 is enough to keep the knife in hand when using while the added lanyard provides extra length for stability.

Continue reading

CRKT Foresight – Badass Knife of the Week

We can’t always predict what’s going to happen in the future. For those times, reach for the CRKT Foresight.

The Foresight is billed as an urban tactical folder with a powerful design ready to tackle all the unpredictability headed your way.

Its blade is just over 3.5 inches of black titanium nitride coated AUS 8 stainless steel, an alloy that’s easy to maintain. The blade comes to life with the flip of a tab and the IKBS ball-bearing opening system.

Continue reading

Gerber Propel – Badass Knife of the Week

Get ready to propel yourself into a whole new world of usefulness and dependability with the Gerber Propel.

The Propel is one of Gerber’s American-made automatic knives that’s durable, deploys quickly and easily, and looks good in the process.

A 3.5-inch 420HC stainless steel blade features a tanto profile with a strong point and a swedge to facilitate its piercing capabilities. The partially serrated edge adds an extra layer of functionality as it can tear through rope and other fibrous material.

Of course, the real highlight of the Propel is the spring-loaded mechanism that fires the blade open with the push of the button. To close the knife, you simply have to press the button lock and push it shut. A safety switch prevents accidental opening in the pocket.

Continue reading

Kershaw Clash – Badass Knife of the Week

There’s never been a better time to be in the market for a cheap but reliable folding knife for everyday carry. The latest Badass Knife of the Week is yet another entry into the “best for the money” category.

The Kershaw Clash is a solid and dependable assisted-opening knife with curves in all the right places.

Its 3.1-inch blade is made from functional 8Cr13MoV stainless steel with a bead-blasted finish. It’s also available in a black finish. The blade springs to life with the push of a flipper tab, which is aided by the SpeedSafe assisted-opening mechanism that will never let you down.

The edge of the knife has a big belly and a slight recurve to take down anything in its path. This version of the Clash features a two-step serration pattern on the lower half of the edge for more fibrous materials that need cutting.

Continue reading

« Older posts Newer posts »

© 2021 The Cutting Edge

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑