The Cutting Edge

The official blog of Knife Depot

Knife Myths: Knives from China are always cheap and inferior

tenacious-china

If you have a few conversations with some of the most ardent knife fans, you’ll usually come to the conclusion that all knives from China are pieces of junk. Some people won’t even look at China-made knives because nothing can beat a quality American-made blade.

Strap yourself in because I’m here to bust the myth that all knives from China are cheap and inferior to knives made in the United States.

Let me start with a disclaimer: If you only buy knives from the United States because you believe in supporting the local economy and encouraging American businesses that employ Americans, that’s fine and commendable. I can’t argue with that moral approach to things. But if you refuse to buy any knives from China because you think they’re junk, you’re simply wrong.

Why Everything is Made in China

Unless you’re diligent, nearly everything you own comes from China. Most parts on the computer or phone you’re looking at were made in China, most clothes you’re wearing were made in China.

So when did China become so engrained in our manufacturing? Let’s take a look.

The Korean War in the early 1950s (yes, we’re going back far) was essentially a proxy war between the United States and Soviet communist-supported allies like China. During the Korean War, all trade between China and the United States was frozen. This embargo would go on until 1970, when the Nixon administration began laying the groundwork to lift the ban on US-China trade.

Richard Nixon with Mao Zedong

Richard Nixon with Mao Zedong

In 1972, President Richard Nixon made a historic visit to China to improve relations between the US and China. In the following years, the two countries signed agreements to improve trade.

I won’t go into too much detail, but working conditions in China give the country an advantage over manufacturing in the United States—mainly in cost and efficiency. While, yes, workers in China have historically been paid a lot less and work a lot more, China has an infrastructure that allows for the manufacturing of more goods at large quantities.

Rise of Knives Made in China

Prior to the 1970s, pretty much all knives marketed in the United States were made in the United States or Europe. The iconic Buck 110 Folding Hunter that became one of the best-selling knives of all time was made in the good ol’ USA. But the shift toward knives manufactured in China (and other countries in Asia) was slow but steady.

china-stockman

Redhead Large Stockman

Brands began shifting over to factories in China and those that didn’t suffered. Schrade, for example, closed its doors in 2004. Taylor Brands LLC saved Schrade (as well as Uncle Henry and Old Timer) by moving much of its manufacturing to China.

A.G. Russell, which formerly made its knives in the United States made the switch to China as well. In a heartfelt note on its website, A.G. Russell explained the reasoning:

Like so many of my customers, I have railed against the movement of the Cutlery Industry to China, BUT it became obvious that if I wanted to stay in business I would have to produce more and more of my own designs and find a way to offer those knives at prices my customers would pay. The only answer was to find one or more makers in Taiwan and China that I could teach to make the quality I require.

Even companies like Kershaw and Buck, which are known for USA-made knives, have models that are made in China. Kershaw’s best-selling Cryo and Buck’s popular Colleague are made in China.

Not All Chinese Knives are Junk

As I explained in the previous section, many of the most respected knife companies make knives both in China and the United States. The Spyderco Tenacious is a truly beloved knife that’s billed as a fantastic EDC—and it’s made in China too.

In fact, we could make a long list of great Chinese-made knives. Some people take issue with the fact that companies like Buck, which have a long tradition of selling knives made in the USA, have Chinese knives. These knives are typically less expensive but just as well-constructed as their American-made brethren.

Sure, there are awful Chinese knives out there you can buy at a gas station for $2.99, but no one expects great performance in those. Companies like KA-BAR have quality control departments that inspect its imported knives to ensure you get high-quality knives.

Not Your Daddy’s Chinese Knives

It’s one thing for a company in America to sell knives made in China, but it’s another thing for a Chinese company to sell knives made in China. While that used to be a clear-cut sign that a knife is cheap and poorly made, that’s no longer the case.

For that, we thank a company called Kizer Knives.

Kizer really made the scene after its Ki3404 was well-received. It’s an excellent EDC knife at a price point above $100—more than most Chinese knives but dirt cheap for its premium materials like CPM-S35VN steel and a titanium frame lock.

kizer-gemini

Kizer Gemini

Then Kizer solidified itself as a true choice for knife enthusiasts with the Kizer Gemini. This knife is a production version of Ray Laconico’s Jasmine. Many people were arguing this knife as the knife of the year for 2015. At a sub-$200 price range, this knife holds its own against America’s finest knives. Here’s just one of the gushing reviews about the Gemini.

It’s too early to say there will be more companies from China like Kizer that are willing to focus on bringing well-constructed knives that undergo rigorous quality control, but Kizer is singlehandedly changing people’s minds about Chinese knives.

Beware the Knockoffs

After all the praise for Chinese knives, it’s important to realize that—just like anything—not all Chinese knives are great. In fact, you should be wary of poorly made Chinese knives that are designed to trick consumers. Even if it’s dirt cheap, these knives should be avoided at all costs. They help fuel a black market.

SOG_Counterfeit

Counterfeit SOG

Aside from that, you will always find poorly made Chinese knives just like you can also find bad USA-made knives, whether they slipped through QC or simply have poor designs.

So for all you people out there that think all Chinese knives are junk, it’s time to start expanding your horizons and picking up some awesome knives you’re missing out on.

49 Comments

  1. I totally agree. I have some excellent assisted openers from China but there’s definitely some dodgie ones to keep an eye out for.
    After reading your article about the Bad Arse (i’m Australian, an Ass is a donkey here) Rajah 11, I went looking on Ali express and found one for au$58. Bargain. Then I realised it looked a bit small. Turns out that it’s only half the size of a genuine Rajah11 . Buyer beware.

    • You MAY have bought the Raja III. I have both and it is quite a bit smaller than the II. I got my III for about $38, but I’ve seen them for what you paid.

    • I have found 4 knives that were left to me when my husband died in 2004. One is an original three bladed Purina Brand Checkered pocket knife, mid to large size. One looks like a Mother of Pearl Stiletto; it is made in China. One is a stainless steel with the number 440 on the blade next to the handle. It has holes up the handle and one large hole in the blade and the blade is slightly curved. There are also ridges at the back of the blade It does not say where it’s made. Then there is a light camouflage knife about three inches long, before the blade is opened. It has a curved blade with the blade itself serrated. It has clip on the side with stainless steel China on the blade and the number 44429 on the other side of the blade. I also have a green handled knife with one blade, made in china, with silver looking ends. I checked the Purina knife and the site said that it could possibly be worth as much as 200.00 dollars, mint cond. How do I find out about the others? They are all in really good cond, with the exception of the Purina Brand knife. It is quite dirty, but I am cleaning that one now.

    • I agree that SOME ( not all) knives from China are amazing. Go look at the kizer vanguard series. I currently edc the Spyderco Tenacious and it is one of the best knives I have ever handled.

  2. Joel Levinson

    June 23, 2016 at 5:52 pm

    The first thing to look at is brand name. Some are more consistent in quality than. Additionally, brand names have a vested interest in quality control. The rest is up to us to let others know when we are happy with a blade or when we are disappointed. Let the company know the specifics as well, briefly. You may be surprised!

  3. matthew feldman

    July 5, 2016 at 8:13 am

    I am one of those people that think we should be supporting American jobs. I live in a major US city and see poverty. People want to work but there isn’t jobs. People would love to do one of these jobs.

    • Tim

      July 5, 2016 at 10:55 am

      I have no issue with that. I’d love to see more American knife jobs.

    • I whole hardly agree. I worked as a steelworker for 33 years and know the domino affect that China’s imports have done to America’s steel industry and so many other American industries too.There are times when I shop I don’t have a choice in what is available USA or imports. But I would rather pay more for USA products than buy from China. American IS better. The knives of imports seem to fall short in quality overall. Be American, buy American till it hurts. Your country will benefit in the long run. Don’t support Communism, and their underhanded and unfair trade practices.

      • I stopped caring about buying American after the autoworkers nearly bankrupted Chrysler for the SECOND time! Thanks to our tax dollars, Chrysler and their pensions were bailed out. That still makes me want to throw up!
        When American union workers realize that the main reason they get paid TOO MUCH is the organized crime method of terrorizing business owners through extortion, and they realize they SHOULD be getting paid less money, then I will think about buying American. Oh, and the product has too last and be at least as well made as other foreign “junk”.

    • I was in the same boat about Chinese knives. I was surprised to see some Kershaw and even more so to see some KaBar with “China” stamped on them. But, when people make a comment about “cheap, poorly made stuff” from China, I say, “ya, like my iPhone”. Basically, one of the best pieces of tech ever built…and it’s made in China. So they CAN build good stuff, but they can also produce horrible crap. However, i don’t associate “made in America” with quality, just expense. The labor cost in the US is SO much higher than Asia, it is a large part of the problem. Anyone with decent QC can create quality stuff. American hands aren’t magical. Ironically, when it comes to the comment about employing Americans and “buying American”, isn’t it ironic that when you buy a Ford (soon), or even a John Deere, some iconic American brands, you’re really employing Mexicans. But when you buy a Toyota, assembled near San Antonio, Texas, you are likely employing more Americans. So what does it even mean to “buy American” anyway? And to keep costs competitive, it seems American made means cheaper components or cutting corners. I’d like to see “made by American robots” maybe to help keep costs down and quality up. Sure, hand crafted custom knives made by Americans could be fantastic, but it’s just as fantastic made by a Japanese or German…or even skilled Chinese. When I see highly paid union workers acting like Frenchmen, knowing they cannot be fired even for shoddy work, it makes me resent buying American. And as for “people want to work”, what you mean is they want to work if you pay them a substantial income, otherwise they’ll just keep their $30k/yr benefits from the government. I’ve hired many people who “want to work” and only make it a few days because the work is “too hard” or it’s “too hot”. A customer of mine says they are hiring as many linemen (telephone stuff) as they can but nobody wants to do the job…and within just 4 years they’d make $50-$60k. Day labor Mexicans are now demanding $100/day and a free lunch. That tells you that, around here anyway, you cannot even find a “normal” person to do the work for $100/day. Build me a quality, American made knife for around $100 and I’ll buy it. Thanks to Obama and the “must go to college to be somebody” pitch, our younger generation has no skills, no artisanship, no marketable talents. hell, most of them cannot even cook mac and cheese or wash their own clothes…forget fixing an ax handle, tying a knot, changing their oil, or mending a stitch. Makes it hard to buy American when Americans can’t make anything worth buying (obvious generalization, but you get the idea).

  4. Jeff Nicholson

    July 5, 2016 at 9:02 am

    Among the 200+ (folding) knives I own, I have knives from Kizer, Real Steel, and Enlan…all Chinese, and all excellent knives. The Kizer and Real Steel knives are as well made as any knives on the market.

    Check out the Kizer Sovereign, Real Steel H1 Blue Sheep, or the Enlan EL-01. I carry these just as often as my Tenacious or Blurs.

    • Delmar Nicholson

      February 20, 2018 at 2:28 am

      2469 N.Hilltop Ln.
      —Hey there Jeff, just reading an old thread and BAM there you are. Btw I agree with you.

    • WE knives are excellent products… great materials, excellent fit and finish. I own several and they are all fine knives. Spyderco also makes knives in Seki City, Japan, quality knives.

  5. Excellent article; balanced and well-written, as always. The story with China is exactly the same as with Japan, South Korea and other places. Younger readers may not even be able remember the day when Made in Japan meant that something was supposedly cheap and poorly-made. Now the Japanese companies reserve their high-tier product for Japanese factories, farming out a lot of the less costly stuff elsewhere. They know when wealthy customers buy that Lexus, they want to see “Made in Japan” on the window sticker. China is going the same way.

    I do like American-made when I can get it. We are fortunate to have many masterful craftsmen in the knife business, but like Lexus, they have to devote their attention to costlier, higher-priced product.

    • Interesting article,i myself have chinese, japan n taiwanese made brands and have to add that the blade material is the seller.im always on the hunt for a good blade to add to my collection and I do scrutinize quality and maker always.thanku for the education now i have more ammo when some knife critic says oterwise,il inform them of your article and to plug into knife-depot to stay on top of the knife life,amen brother!

  6. I always buy made in U.S.A. knives first, then I look at European knives (mostly from Germany and Sweden, although I have found some very nice knives from Spain as well). I don’t knock Chinese made knives, I mean most of the major manufacturers today have a good portion of their knives made there and I have bought a few modern Schrade’s and CRKT knives that have had excellent blades and excellent fit/finish. In fact if Schrade did not make them in China today we’d probably not have some of the more modern bushcraft designs that they have been releasing in the past few years like their SCHF42 and SCHF51, which are two of my favorites. A lot of people will knock Schrade and the China made knives but the quality and types of steel they are using today are much better than when they were being made in the U.S.A. 30 years ago.

  7. No matter where the knife is made, or the cost, if not high carbon 1055, 1085 carbon steel, also titanium, the 440 stainless is so soft. Not only can you NOT throw it [like me], but the tip and the edge simply is so soft, it won’t last. Soon, you’ll have a nub for a blade. And, l throw many times to keep eye-distance and muscle memory. When l say many times, l mean 500 to 700 times a week. l depend on my throwing skills to survive, even more over my firearms. BTW, l can not reveal all, due to ‘classified confidential’, but my combat training was NOT in USA. Thanks to Obama, he has madew USA weak! My training has been over 30 years. when l saw the traditional training of Combat martial Arts; hand to hand going to the dogs, l contacted my CO [not in USA] and finished, received my Master’s level in Combat MA’s. We MUST become strong again, as a country! If not, we will see our beloved USA overcome by groups of terrorists. Which, is happening now. In every state of our country; and 80% of every county of every state. AMERICA!! WAAAKE UP! This includes ‘made in USA! l know this forum is about knives. but the author took us back to Korea. Do you ever wonder why that little country of So Korea, no bigger than Maine, thrives? lt’s because they ‘take no prisoners’….there is no “awww, poor terrorist, no water boarding”…it’s ‘too bad, you’re caught, now dead! They are stronger than most of our military; don’t get me wrong! l’m a huge patriot/soldier. lf my orders are “stand in the corner”; l stand in the corner. lf they are, “take this out”, l take it out. End of story.

    • Amen to that. I agree that the USA is getting weaker. If we don’t wake up we won’t even have the ability to defend ourselves. I am 60 years old and have been working since I was 13 years old. My father was a Sargent Major in the US Army and he saw to it that I understood the importance of working and earning to survive on your own. Unfortunately, he passed away when I was 15 years old, but the lessons are ingrained in my DNA. I have made sure that I instilled the same work ethic for my two sons. I am so glad that Obama and his Islamic agenda are soon to be leaving the white house. Unemployment is up, people feel that they are owed a lifestyle that Uncle Sam should provide. I fear for the future generation, as the America I grew up with will be no longer be available to them. I’m rambling, I apologize. Just wanted to let you know that I agree with your post.

  8. Nice article. I have purchased some knives from China, Sanrenmu, Harnds, Enlan, Ganzo, to name a few. I find that they make well built, sharp, and functional knives, most made with 8Cr14MoV for blade material, I believe that some of these companies are companies that make knives for US knife companies. Kershaw has a Volt II, straight blade, Harnds has Knight, they look the same (handle, blade, size, pocket clip, difference is that Kershaw is “Speed-safe” and Harnds is manual, also Kershaw is 8Cr13MoV, and Harnds is 8Cr14MoV. Worth checking out some of these knives.

  9. Richard Mooney

    July 5, 2016 at 8:19 pm

    I love American made knives……well made good steel. But so high priced I can’t afford them. My EDC is a Cold Steel AK47 been carrying it since 2008 and 2 1/2 tours of Afghanistan with it. And it’s made in China. I also carry a CRKT Fossil, one of the best knives I’ve owned. (By the way I own over 500 edged weapons my call sign in Afghanistan was Blade) if I could get the quality as well as the price with American made blades I would buy nothing but American. But unfortunately I can’t afford 200, to 400 for a knife that’s not any better than a 30 to 60 dollar one made in China or Japan.

  10. We are cutting our own throats [pun intended] buying from Red, Communist, rights-violating China! It’s pocket knives and cheap tennie sneakers today and bayonets and combat boots tomorrow and if you don’t think China is thinking that way, well, you just haven’t been paying attention. They are our biggest enemy and we had better wake up and realize it pretty soon.

  11. Where I can buy lots of knives from China? Tks.

    • deadlyknivessharpswords

      October 18, 2018 at 8:36 am

      You can buy them from me on eBay…in my one dollar auction…which lets you decide what they are worth.. I have hundreds of them some are cheap junk some are good as any American made knife…theharmonicaking on eBAY

  12. Just picked up a Spyderco Tenacious at my local Wal Mart for $37. I like Spyderco’s designs and this one caught my eye. They only had 2 in the store and I had never seen a Spyderco knife at Wal Mart, so I snagged one right away. This is THE BEST Chinese made knife I have ever seen, hands down. G10 is my favorite handle material and I love the 4 position clip. This knife is razor sharp right out of the box, locks up tight as a drum and overall is very well made. I don’t even mind that is says “China” on the blade!

  13. Yeah china knife is usually sold on cheap prices, I really appreciate it for sharing such an amazing information with me 🙂 Can you please also tell me where I can buy Army Knife from ? as I am thinking of keeping them because they really look cool, do let me know soon, Thanks 🙂

  14. I do agree that there are quality knives made overseas. There are many good brands that are manufactured in China.
    Growing up I learned from my elders. Many of them fought for us in WW II and and Korea. They always told me to look for the Made in the U.S.A. Label/stamp.
    Now for those that blame labor unions. I am sorry that you have an negative opinion and I wished you would educate yourselves better when it comes to labor unions.
    So far as a knife goes. My edc is made in Tawain but all my collectibles are made in the U.S.A.
    Union proud

  15. Mark T. Tsunokai

    June 16, 2017 at 12:36 am

    I don’t have any Chinese made knives in my collection. I’ve been collecting knives for 36 years. I would be willing to look into a Chinese made knife, but have yet to find one I like. Most of mine are U.S., Japanese, English, and Russian.

  16. Gene Silvernail

    October 18, 2017 at 7:04 pm

    In 2014, at age 68, I went to the the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) on a 4 month assignment to work on a nuclear power plant in Dongping, Guangdong province. I lived in Yangjiang traveling daily to the job site in Dongping. Why?, it was on my bucket list . The metropolis city of Yangjiang. Yangjiang was a small city of only 2.5 million. Small by PRC standards that had no airport and required that I traveled by car 4 to 5 hours to the nearest airport at Guanzhou. It was during these repatriation car trips, in and out of China, that I discovered a wiz-break roadside gas station that sold a bunch of knives. Just like good old USA gas stations, not quite.

    The difference in PRC Guangdong gas stops is that all the knives displayed are local products. The pricing on these gas-station knives spanned 20 to 90 RMB (approx 6 RMB to a $) so roughly $3 to $15 dollars. I bought a few. Some were quite nice, with nice in my world being akin to my Schrade Old Timer. Some, not so good. When translating the package writting on my first batch of knives I was amazed to see that all knives were made in Yangjiang, the city I lived in. Yangjiang is the knife capaital of the PRC with over 1200 vendors some big and some very small.

    My 4 months turned into 14 and 9 trips in and out of the PRC. Big check mark on the bucket list. During this period I replaced KTV clubbing on the weekend with knife hunting.

    It proved to be an education that changed my appreciation for and understanding of what goes into a quality knife regardless of country of origin. The material, craftsmanship, and quality verification must merge to get a great knife and be understood by the beholder.

    The majority of the knives I brought back home could, by examination, speak chronologically to my knowledge gained during my knife schooling. Early on, gas-station variety knives are present, later quality unique findings joined my collection.

    Some of these great knives are Chinese marked with no western references. I bought from a street craftsman that would work a week or more over a charcoal-fired foot-bellows pot hammering and folding away in front of his shop. It has a hand made wooden sheath. Good quality is something I learned to recognize over the year there. It was fun and kept my busy and sober on the week ends….most of the time.

    One last anecdote. In Yangjiang my crew stayed in a newly openned IHG hotel called the Hualuxe. There was an executive lounge with nightly happy. Many times you would see a new western face and that called for an introduction and exchange of why you were in Southern China. During these soirres I ran into and imbibbed with more than a hand full of CEO, VPs and owners of well known knife brands. I traded some of my knives with them for their products all over a few beers/cocktails. I remember a comment by one West Coast CEO that when shown one of finds smiled. Flicking open and close several times he handed it to his VP of marketing with the comment “The action is better than ours”

    Sorry for being long winded.

  17. The thing people close their eyes or minds to is; if the China made stuff was no good then there would not be the amount of it we see today. Consumers are not going to pay a lower price for trash, the market for China made goods would have disappeared. But they have flourished instead. What did disappear? American workers who wanted 5 times the pay as reasonable or competitive.
    In high school in the 70’s(yes, I am that old) we had a history teacher who would tell us on a regular basis that the labor unions were ruining America, that the workers were paid too much for the level of work they performed. He was correct.
    The knife market is correcting itself, the demand for awesome knifes at bargain prices has driven the price down across the board. I myself want an awesome knife in my pocket(in each pocket, who carries just one?) and a vast collection at home. So I will buy 15 CRKT knives instead of 1 ZT that is so beautiful and expensive it will never taste anything stronger than shipping tape.

  18. I received a “bonus” knife from the NRA. You guessed it. Proudly stamped “China”.

    • Robert E Leasure

      March 15, 2019 at 5:37 pm

      WELL CHINA HAS BEEN MAKING KNIVES A COUPLE THOUSAND YEARS LONGER THAN AMERICA HAS BEEN AMERICA..SO IT IS JUST STUPID TO THINK THEY CAN’T MAKE A QUALITY KNIFE…QUALITY IS QUALITY NO MATTER WHERE IT COMES FROM..YOU JUST HAVE TO BE ABLE TO KNOW IT WHEN YOU SEE IT….

  19. The american companies make there budget knives there. The chinese rip off so many good brands. It seems like most of the knock off come from there. There are so many good american brands and great customs. Its difficult to even care if there are some good chinese knife makers

  20. Old Man Vee Midwest

    May 24, 2018 at 10:03 am

    Totally agree with you.
    first higher price does not mean higher quality, imagine if cellphones were made in America, with their union pays, no one in America would be able to afford a phone.

    There is a little misconception about ripping other brands off.

    Companies around the world pay the factories to produce the knives, those factories produce knives for other companies as well. If the American company decided to use these factories then they know eventually, that factory’s owner will reuse those molds and stamps for other companies, no law around that. Thats why certain companies buy factories out right so they have they have control of whats going on and how much security there is.

    Yes there are the exceptions but how I see it is…everyones copying/inspiring everyone, and if you think other wise, you are nieve.

    Chrysler should have gone under, if its their business strategy that destroyed them then all those pensions should have been gone as well.

    Pick your poison, tax payers bail out chrysler so they can pay Americans the pensions that they earned through contract negotiation, or let the company die because they made bad business strategies and no one gets pensions.

    In Asia…a pension is a very rare thing especially for a factory worker. If North America wants to compete with Asian factory workers. Then the life style we love will have to change as well. Asian made things are not of lower quality in my opinion, but the stuff that gets imported to north america is garbage. Why would small companies in china that make good products for a cheap price bother shipping else where, when the surrounding countries already have over 1.2 billion people. Been seeing this trend sine the 70s, americans get cheap china stuff, cheap asian stuff, but when you live in the country and know what you are looking for, All I get are quality products. Their are choices and price ranges, Like any product

    Also shouldn’t be saying China is stealing American jobs away, if the wages and cost to produce in America was more competitive, then companies would not go overseas.

  21. Totally agree with your well written article!

  22. China can put people in space. You choose the price u pay in China, u pay low u get junk u pay high you get quality, China high quality costs far less then in the west.

  23. deadlyknivessharpswords

    October 18, 2018 at 9:09 pm

    AMERICANS SAID THE SAME THINGS ABOUT JAPAN IN THE SIXTIES….
    If it was stamped Japan it was considered junk….Now today the same is said of China…I have the whole line of Remington knives and Winchester knives from the 1920’s and there are no manufactured knives in America that compare too the quality of those knives…
    The world is getting smaller and it is adapt or die…A lot of people who rode horses said they would never change but where are all the horses today??? they call them cars and motorcycles…. Let China have those jobs …we are Americans we lead the way our power is in leading the way into new jobs new ideas….We are the responsible for building like that the worlds largest Hotel in Dubai …Arabs might have paid for it, but the bottom line it would never have been built without our engineers….let third world have manual labor we are the thinkers of this world and will always be as long as we can adapt to change…Or go live in a cave learn how to just survive…chop wood…hunt game…grow gardens…but most of all make your own damn knives then you wont have any one to blame for the quality but your own self…

  24. Well it’s 2018 now and we’re in the middle of a trade war with China, the world’s most economically and militarily powerful totalitarian dictatorship that has openly declared their intent to create a new world order with themselves at the top. And they are already waging war against the West and US allied nations in Asia through economic domination. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army trains with the United States as the designated enemy.
    Over the last two decades China has flooded our markets with fgoods including electronics. The US and other governments have now banned Chinese cellphones because they were found to be sending data to China. Stealing technology and ignoring intellectual property rights constitutes a major portion of China’s great economic progress. So what writer, either remarkably ignorant of geopolitics, or on the Chinese payroll writes this “knife world” version of CCP propaganda? If you are American, support American made. Or at least made in Japan or Taiwan, both U.S. allies. Not made in an adversarial dictatorship that is working against us. Every industry in the U.S., is now waking up to this reality,. It’s about time the Knife world stops “praising China” and working against America.

  25. You make the following statement in your otherwise rather good article.
    “Prior to the 1970s, pretty much all knives were made in the United States or Europe. ” Perhaps if you changed that to “Prior to the 1970s, pretty much all knives MARKETED IN THE U.S. were made in the United States or Europe. ” it would make more sense. Take Japan for example. Their history of high quality blade making is one of the richest and most well known in the world. And as you might guess, the Japanese first learned about metallurgy and blade making from China! My point is that along with all the junk, there has long been a healthy industry of extremely high quality knife makers in many countries that are not located in the U.S. or Europe. Japan is just one example. I happen to live and work in Japan and I would love to own a few more high quality Japanese knives but the truth is, I can’t afford them so I happily settle for the likes of Bark River Knives, primarily because they are so affordable! I can get them for around $200 and something of similar quality made here in Japan would cost more than twice as much! Oh by the way, I do have a few $20 and $30 Chinese knives ordered over the internet just out of curiosity, and will gladly agree… you get what you pay for.

    • Tim

      December 14, 2018 at 9:08 pm

      That’s an excellent point, and I changed that sentence to better clarify the point. I didn’t mean to ignore the robust history of knives made around the world long before the United States even became a factor!

  26. I bought a frost cutlery peanut mostly to see what kind of quality you can get for less than ten bucks. I assumed it would be junk, but I was very surprised at how well made and pretty the knife is. I showed it to a friend in work and he thought it was an old American knife from back in the day. Fact is I have several Rough Rider peanuts that I also bought just to see the quality. They’re all pretty nice, especially for the pittance they cost. I have a Kutmaster, and a Colonial peanut, and (don’t hate me) all these Chinese knives are just as nice or better. They’re not as good as my Case, but for the ridiculously low price, they’re not THAT much worse.

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