The Cutting Edge

The official blog of Knife Depot

Category: Knife Stuff (page 1 of 5)

20 Knife Gift Ideas Under $100

Our suggestions for gift ideas at certain price ranges continues with 20 knife gift ideas under $100.

This list only features knives in the $50 to $100 price range. If you’re interested in the $20 to $50 range, check out our 20 knife gift ideas under $50 post. For prices under that, check out our 20 knife gift ideas under $20.

These recommendations cover the full gamut of styles, designs, and functions, so if you can’t find something to your satisfaction, you’re trying too hard.

1) Spyderco Para 3 Lightweight

The first few iterations of this list featured the iconic Benchmade Mini Griptilian here. Unfortunately, rising prices have pushed this still great knife off the list. But the replacement may be a better overall knife.

The Para 3 Lightweight is a new offering from Spyderco with a great design, quality materials, and is made in the United States. The blade is under two inches and locks into place with the Compression Lock.

2) Spyderco Delica 4

Spyderco makes a ton of great knives at a budget cost, but for a true representation of the quality and design elements of the brand (aside from the first knife on this list), there’s the Delica. This is a truly beloved knife from the knife community because of its versatile size, excellent construction, and interesting design.

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20 Knife Gift Ideas Under $50

Note: Post updated in 2019.

If you’re like me, trying to find a gift is the worst. Fortunately, for you, helping you find the perfect gift is part of my job.

I’ve written about 20 different knife-related gifts for under $20 with some great options. But, if your budget for a good friend or little brother is a little higher, we got you covered.

Here are 20 knife-related gift ideas for under $50. These include some of the best-sellers at Knife Depot and products people have been excited about recently.

1. Spyderco Tenacious

We’ll start with an easy option that just ekes in under the budget: the Spyderco Tenacious. This is not only one of our best-sellers, but it is one of the most renowned budget knives around. It showcases all that Spyderco has to offer in an affordable package.

This version has a 3.38-inch 8Cr13MoV stainless steel blade, grippy G-10 handle, and pronounced Round Hole. For under $50, it’s hard to find such a beloved knife as this.

2. Kershaw Reverb

The Reverb is an interesting little knife. This futuristic-looking folder was named one of the top sellers of 2017 by Knife News, and it’s not hard to see why. The small 2.5-inch blade is versatile and its machined recess allows for easy, one-handed opening.

A combo G-10 and carbon fiber handle adds some texture to the grip while a carabiner in the back allows for versatile carry. The best part about this knife is you can really take it anywhere you go.

3. Schrade Old Timer 6OT Golden Bear

From the modern to the classic, the next item under $50 is the Old Timer 6OT Golden Bear from Schrade. I’ve always been a big fan of Old Timer knives — the saw cut Delrin handles and the brass bolsters/pins give this knife a look that harkens back to the days of old.

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20 Knife Gift Ideas For Under $20

Note: Post updated in 2019.

Finding a gift for someone is stress, whether it’s a small Christmas gift for a coworker, a graduation gift for your little brother, or a present for Father’s Day.

But don’t worry; we have your back with a good knife.

Here’s a look at 20 easy knife-related gift ideas that are sure to get some genuine smiles and thanks. The best part is that everything’s under $20.

1. Engraved HallMark Lockback

hallmark-stainless-steel

We’ll start with an easy one—the HallMark Stainless Steel Lockback. This is one of our bestsellers at the moment. Why? You can get this reliable little folder laser-engraved with an inscription of your choice for only $14.99. That alone makes this gift a no-brainer.

The knife is nothing to scoff at either. It’s a HallMark folder with a 2-inch blade and smooth stainless steel handles. It’s the perfect little knife to fit in your pocket.

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2. Kershaw Shuffle

Kershaw makes a darn good knife, and you can see its eye for design with the Kershaw Shuffle. This $19.99 knife is an excellent stocking stuffer thanks to its compact design. But this hugely popular knife isn’t just for show. It’s a tough utility knife with a built-in bottle opener and screwdriver/lanyard hole in the handle. The interesting K-texture is grippy and durable.

The Shuffle comes in a few different colors, but our favorite aside from the standard model featured here is the Black Shuffle.

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3. Cold Steel Karambit

cold-steel-karambit-fgx

You can get more than just folders for under $20 too. Check out the Cold Steel FGX Grivory Karambit. The karambit is designed after the claws of large cats found in the jungles of Indonesia. It’s primarily a fighting or self-defense tool, but it also makes a great addition to any collection.

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11 of the Best Bowie Knives to Buy and Use

You know how frustrating it is not to have the right knife for the job. The best Bowie knives around can be used for skinning, cutting meat, and hacking through branches.

There are a lot of bad quality Bowie knives on the market. Cheap, low-quality steel and bad workmanship are rife. We’re here to help you find only high quality Bowie knives.

Owning the best Bowie knife you can will help you whenever you’re outdoors. They’ve got a truly incredible range of uses for the modern outdoorsman. Whether you’re a hiker or love heading out on hunting trips, a strong, full tang Bowie knife can change your life.

Want to learn which knives are worth your time, and which belong in the trash? Read on, and stay sharp!

11. The SOG Super SOG Bowie Fixed Blade SB1-TL

One of the best American-made Bowie Knives, this is one incredible knife. The 7.5 inch blade is extremely sturdy, and the leather handle provides fantastic grip.

The balance is great, and it’s made of strong AUS-8 steel. This knife isn’t cheap, retailing at $199.99, but it’s worth every penny.

10. Cold Steel Natchez Bowie

Another Bowie knife made in the USA, the Natchez is a fantastic option. The blade measures nearly 12 inches, and is made of O-1 carbon steel.

Its handle is made of polished Micarta, which gives solid grip. While not as luxurious-feeling as the Super SOG, it’s a very good option.

9. Buck 124 Heritage Frontiersman

Buck is about as trusted a name in knives as you can get. The full tang Buck 124 Heritage Frontiersman Bowie knife is a fantastic compact option: the 420HC blade measures in at just 6.25 inches.

The knife is sturdy enough for any use you care to name. It’s well-balanced, and the Micarta grip looks classy. It’s cheap too, costing just $149.99.

8. Winchester 14.25″ Bowie Knife

For those on a budget, this monster Winchester Bowie knife is worth a look. It may lack some of the features found on more expensive knives, but its construction is solid.

The huge stainless steel blade can take a beating, but we wouldn’t recommend using it for leverage. This knife is lacking a full tang, so requires a bit more care. Stainless steel also needs a bit more care when sharpening, so bear that in mind.

It’s surprisingly well balanced, though, and also has an impressive pricetag of just $39.99.

7. Ka-Bar Becker BK9

Easily one of the best bowie knives on the market, the BK9 sits at the sweet spot of price and quality. Its nine-inch 1095 Cro-Van 9-steel blade has been thoroughly tested to ensure it withstands anything.

The handle is made of lightweight Grivory, making using this knife a joy. The blade has also been coated in epoxy powder, to add corrosion resistance. All of these features don’t demand a high pricetag: the BK9 costs $124.99.

6. Muela Magnum

This is a knife for those with a taste for the finer things. The Spanish-made Muela Magnum features a handle made of genuine Red Stag antler, which feels like heaven in the hand. The blade is made of 440 chrome-vanadium-molybdenum steel, and is supremely durable.

The handcrafted sheath that comes bundled with the Magnum is the icing on the cake. A heavy, exceptionally well-made knife, the Magnum is Bowie knife royalty.

5. Ontario Spec Plus Raider Bowie

Much like the BK9, the Raider Bowie knife is inspired by our armed forces. Coated in epoxy resin to reduce shine and corrosion, the beefy 9.75 inch blade is seriously strong.

The handle is made of Kraton and gives superb grip. It’s as sturdy as the blade, too, and its pommel can be used as a makeshift hammer.

It’s weighty, seriously tough, and incredibly well-made. There may be more expensive knives, but this is one of the best Bowie knives for value around.

4. Ka-Bar Heavy-Duty Warthog

The Heavy-Duty Warthog is an odd-looking Bowie, but it’s superb at what it does. That being, going for a long time between sharpenings and being used near-constantly. If you want a truly tough knife, this is the best Bowie knife on the market.

The 6.75-inch blade might bear more resemblance to a cleaver than a traditional Bowie, but it can be used as one just the same. The Kraton handle is just as tough as the blade, and can really take a beating.

For under $60, this blade makes a superb knife for any outdoorsman.

3. Schrade SCHF45 Leroy Full-Tang

Priced at just $52, you might not have high expectations for the Schrade SCHF45. You’d be wrong.

The 10-inch blade is heavy enough for any use you’d care to name, and is very well-made. The handle is made of TPE, which, while not a top-class material, is far from terrible. The finger grooves are a very nice feature.

Sharp, cheap, and well-made, this knife offers amazing value.

2. Case Cutlery White Hunter

If you’re looking for a unique Bowie knife, they don’t come much more distinctive than the White Hunter. Its characteristic white polymer handle is eye-catching, while providing solid grip.

The Tru-Sharp blade is absolutely incredible, too. One of the sharpest Bowie knives around, this baby can cut through anything with ease. It’s mirror-polished too, adding to the stylish look of the knife.

Easy to sharpen, incredibly good-looking, and very practical, this knife will have pride of place in any collection.

1. Ka-Bar Full-Size US Army Knife

The world-famous Ka-bar Bowie knife is one of the best all-rounders on the market. It has to be, developed into its current legendary form by generations of servicemen.

If you need to build shelters, skin game, or even fight off a predatory animal, then this is the knife for you. Don’t let its reputation as a fighting knife put you off. It’s just as practical for the great outdoors.

For under $100, this knife offers practicality, strength, and high build quality.

What Do You Think Are the Best Bowie Knives?

We’re curious to hear what you think are the best Bowie knives on the market today. Which knives do you trust? Let us know in the comments; we’d love to hear from you!

Got any other questions? Get in touch with us!

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How To Choose The Best Pocket Knife For You: A First-Time Buyer’s Guide

Buying your first pocket knife?

Purchasing one can seem intimidating if it’s your first time. Some people assume pocket knives are all the same but they’re not! There are so many factors to consider if you want to buy the best pocket knife for your specific needs.

Take a deep breath; we’re here to help you out. Check out our guide below for 8 crucial steps to get the best folding knife:

1. How Many Blades?

One of the first things you have to figure out is whether you want one blade, two, or more. This decision heavily alters all other factors and this is why we’re looking at it first.

A knife with a single blade gives you optimal functionality but for one purpose. You’ll get a dedicated carving knife, a dedicated hunting knife, and so on.

Getting multiple blades works the other way around. Swiss knives a Jack-of-All-Trades deal. They’re good at multiple tasks but none of the blades are strong enough to be your ideal choice.

If you’re out hunting, a single blade is all you need. If you need a knife for odd repairs, then a Swiss knife with different blades and small tools is a better fit.

2. Carrying It Around

Decided whether you want a single blade or a multi-blade knife? Congratulations, now you have to figure out how to carry it.

Take a moment to read pocketknife reviews and videos before buying. Look for any indications of how the knife locks to your pocket or belt.

Smaller pocket knives often don’t come with clips but they’re easy to slide loosely into your pocket. Larger knives use clips and this ensures they don’t weigh down on your pockets. The best pocket knife should satisfy both aesthetics and comfort demands so consider which carrying style suits your tastes.

3. Open and Lock Systems

These are some of the most important aspects to consider. When you buy pocket knife products, take time to first learn the legalities of the opening system in your area.

Some places, like in the UK, don’t allow people to carry a fully-automatic system. In the US, it differs from state to state.

There are three main types: manual open, automatic open, and semi-automatic open.

Manual knives are the old-fashioned designs in which you have to pull the blade out of the fold, requiring two hands. Semi-automatics require you to pull the blade out a bit before it pops out. Automatic open simply require a button press to open the blade and lock it steadily in place.

Also, consider the locking system too. Frame locks, liner locks, and lock-backs determine you can use the knife with one hand or two.

4. Blade Size

If this is your first pocket knife, don’t forget to look at the length of the blade too. Smaller blades are great for light tasks and are likely legal anywhere you go. Medium to large blades are heavier and you may run into legal issues depending on local laws regarding weapons and dangerous tools.

The blade’s length also determines the kind of work it can tackle. Smaller blades are great for tasks in tight spaces and those that need a fragile touch. Larger blades won’t work well for those cases but they’re the better choice for heavy-duty work.

5. Knife Material

When it comes to materials and build of the blade, it boils down to two main options: carbon and stainless steel. There are also high-carbon stainless steel knives and alloys of different mixtures.

Carbon and stainless steel reign supreme due to their durability. To determine a knife’s hardness, ask for its HRC rating. HRC refers to the Rockwell C scale and many consider it more accurate compared to the Mohs scale, which measures resistance.

There is one thing to take note: if you find a pocket knife built from alloy steel, look for a specific list of the metals used. If the knife simply states “stainless steel” with no HRC rating or popular brand, don’t buy it.

6. The Knife Edge

Do you need to cut rope or something similarly tough? Get a pocket knife with a serrated edge. If you need a pocket knife for smooth slicing or push cutting, get a knife with a plain edge.

If you’re not sure or if you might need both edges, get a pocket knife that has both. Some hunting knives have a plain edge along the upper half, close to the tip, and a serrated edge closer to the handle.

7. The Knife Handle

A good edge and a quick open/lock system won’t do you good if the handle isn’t up to standards. Consider the size of the handle with your hands and look around for something with an ergonomic design as this guarantees a comfortable grip.

You should also consider the handle materials.

Bone and wood are the classic choices but you can find pocket knives that use plastic capable of emulating their style and feel. Composite materials and metal are available too and these offer a more contemporary look.

The design matters too. Karambit pocket knives, which originated from the Philippines and Indonesia, have a large loop so you can lock your thumb or small finger. This ensures people can’t slap it off your hand.

Other designs focus on multi-tasking convenience or durability.

8. Price Matters

Now you have to look at pocket knives that fit the previous seven categories and your budget.

How much are pocket knives? Fortunately, pocket knives come in a wide assortment of price ranges, meaning you’re bound to find something that fits your needs and budget. You can find something below $25 and some that go over $100.

Get the Best Pocket Knife Today!

It’s easy to find the best pocket knife once you go through this list and narrow down exactly what you want. The next step is to look for knives that fit all these criteria.

The good news is you’re in luck. We have a wide selection of pocket knives. If you’re having trouble finding what you need, don’t hesitate to message us and let us help you sort things out.

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Most Expensive Models From 20 Popular Brands

 

Knife collecting is a rich man’s game.

Although you can have a robust collection of great knives without putting out a second mortgage on your house or doing Uber as a side hustle to pay your knife addiction, you have to spend quite a bit to really get all the tiers of knives, even from the name brands.

To see just how much you have to spend to see the top-tier knives from each brand, I assembled a list of the most expensive models from some of the most popular brands. I’ve been kicking around this idea in my head lately, but the recent release of the ultra-premium CRKT XOC motivated me to finish this post.

This was kind of tough to do because most of the brands have a special edition premium knife in the offerings or they have a large sword that costs a pretty penny. I decided to limit it to knives and tried to mention the most expensive regular production knife when applicable. These are also only the models in current or recent production.

Take a look.

CRKT XOC

MSRP: $750

Let’s start with one of the most recent announcements: the CRKT XOC. Pronounced “shock,” the XOC was a shock to most of the knife world. Not only is this knife huge, but it also carries a huge price tag. It comes in at $750.

This is a special edition knife though and is only tied for the most expensive the brand has put out. A few years back, CRKT released the limited edition Buy Tighe (a double-bladed folder) and also has the CRKT Motley currently available with an MSRP at $750.

I decided to put the XOC on here instead of the Motley because the Motley can be had for a street price of $425 but it’s unclear what the XOC will ultimately go for.

The most expensive knives are the mini swords from James Williams (the Hisshou at $375 and the Shinbu at $350).

Spyderco Paysan

MSRP: $800
Street Price: $520

In 2018, Spyderco discontinued its then-most expensive knife — the Nirvana with an MSRP at $739.55. But another Peter Rassenti integral frame lock knife took the mantle.

The famous knife brand only recently announced the knife and it hasn’t officially been released but it has an MSRP of $800 and a street price of $520.

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Roundup of the Best 2019 April Fools Jokes

Another April Fools Day is behind us and so are a bunch of hilarious jokes companies and brands pulled.

Instead of moving on, we thought it’d be funny to take a look back at all the best knife-related jokes and pranks for April Fools Day 2019. Here are the main ones we saw and enjoyed. Let us know your favorites in the comments.

Victorinox Survival Rx Glasses

 

I admit that this one initially got me. First because it was sent out in an email on March 29 and second because it’s something I’d actually buy.

Victorinox teased special edition Survival Rx reading glasses with built-in tools like those found in a Swiss Army Knife. There were scissors, a bottle opener, tweezers, a toothpick, and a corkscrew that come off the frames of the glasses.

They even made a video in conjunction with GlassesUSA.com. Check it out:

As a glasses-wearer and daily carrier of a Swiss Army Knife, I was excited to see something like this. Sure, it’s crazy but then I saw the price tag starting at $129 and knew it was a fake.

Still, good idea and great execution. Well done Victorinox and GlassesUSA.com.

Blade Magazine Finds Original Bowie

Blade Magazine is not above having some fun on April Fools Day either.

On April 1, they tweeted this:

Anyone who follows the magazine knows that the original Bowie knife has been an elusive treasure that has yet to be found. Could this finally be it?

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Spyderco Offers Sneak Peek at New Sage Lightweight

 

The IWA OutdoorClassics is an international trade show that takes place every year in Germany.

It is one of the leading trade shows for guns and knives in the world. Although there is not as much buzz as SHOT Show or BLADE Show, major companies do showcase some of their upcoming knives.

When Eric Glesser of Spyderco sat down with YouTuber Artur Saulin (ARHADYR) to talk about the new knives of 2019, they were all knives we’re familiar with — including a few that appeared in the first 2019 Reveal Catalog.

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UK Politician Advocates for GPS Trackers on Every Knife

 

I’ve been sympathetic to the complicated relationship between the United Kingdom and knives. There’s no doubt knife crime is a major issue in the country and that something needs to be done about it.

I even wrote a nuanced conversation about how to look at knife crime in the country in a moment when everyone was poking fun at the mayor of London for tweeting that there was never any reason to carry a knife (despite my article listing 101 uses for a pocket knife).

But sometimes people go a little too far. Take a look at this tweet from member of Parliament Scott Mann:

That’s right… he just said that all knives sold in the UK should have GPS trackers built into the handle. Think about that because Mann certainly didn’t.

How many knives are currently in the UK? There are roughly 27.2 million households in the UK. Let’s be conservative and say each household has four kitchen knives (which is about a dozen less than I have). That’s more than 108 million knives just in the kitchen.

Add the countless pocket knives and fixed blades — both those used legitimately and illegitimately — and you get hundreds of millions of knives already in the country. On top of that, what exactly would putting a GPS tracker on a knife accomplish? Then you’d have to make sure they were all charged all the time.

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Toddler Using Kitchen Knife Sparks Controversy

It’s pretty rare when you come to the intersection of mommy blogs and knife blogs, but that’s where we meet today.

A woman who blogs and podcasts about parenting recently posted a video that has sparked conversation and even outrage among parents. And it’s something we’ve talked about on this very blog as well.

Take a look:

Kathleen's capable boy

Awesome!!! I love this from Kathleen:"I’ve been working on giving my 2.5 year old meaningful helper roles during our household tasks—not just to “occupy” him while I get things done, but ways he can really contribute—pairing socks, putting away the silverware, wiping the low surfaces in the kitchen with a rag, etc. Tonight he chopped all the cucumbers for the salad while I prepared the rest of dinner. Then he dressed and mixed it. I really enjoyed making dinner together tonight, and the pushed I’ve gotten around trust from this group have helped. Thank you!"

Posted by Janet Lansbury on Tuesday, January 8, 2019

A woman named Kathleen lets her two-and-a-half-year-old son help around the house in a serious way. In a video posted on Facebook, you see the little guy using a knife to cut up some cucumbers en route to making a salad.

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Watch YouTuber Make a Knife From a Stone

 

Kiwami Japan is one of the my favorite YouTubers out there. Not only do his videos show the process of turning some extraordinary material into a knife but they typically follow some sort of entertaining or bizarre story structure.

For example, his latest video saw his toy dog die and he had to make an unbreakable and unscratchable knife to hold its picture. I’ll just stick that here for your enjoyment:

But one of my favorite of his recent videos is a pretty straightforward video on making a primitive knife out of stone. Continue reading

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10 Nitpicky Knife Design Annoyances

Making a knife is hard. There are so many things to take into consideration — from design to materials.

Criticizing a knife is easy. There are so many little things to nitpick about the design.

While I understand knife designers will likely cringe and complain about this complaint thread from some blogboy, someone’s got to do the dirty work. These aren’t design flaws that completely ruin a knife (well, for normal people anyway), but they can be pretty annoying design decisions or failures.

Here are 10 design nitpicks that I personally find annoying. Let us know your additions in the comments.

Incomplete Sharpening Choil

A choil is that little space between the handle and the edge of the blade. It is typically unsharpened and usually designed to put a finger in to choke up on the blade for more control. However, it can often serve another function as a sharpening choil.

 

This allows the knife user to sharpen the blade completely with their desired sharpener. For some reason, there are a number of edges that abruptly stop before it gets to the choil. That means there’s an unnecessary unsharpened portion of the edge before getting to the unsharpened portion of the choil.

Nitpicky? Yes. Annoying? Also, yes.

Thumb Stud in Blade Path

The thumb stud is a tried-and-true method for opening a knife. While there have been a number of advances in opening (just check out our popular post on knives with unique opening mechanisms), the thumb stud remains a favorite.

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How Amazon Profits Off Counterfeits

Fake knives are a big concern. If you buy from eBay or some less than stellar sites like Alibaba, there’s a fair chance that the knife you get is a fake.

But, if you were to buy a knife from a site like Amazon, it has to be real, right? Not exactly.

We have had a lot of complaints about the way Amazon does business over the years. For example, earlier this year, we wrote about how the massive online store restricts the sale of legal knives to some people. Back in 2013, we also wrote about how sites like Amazon have a leg up selling knives against smaller businesses such as ours thanks to Google.

But, one of our biggest complaints with Amazon has been the fact that they are plagued with counterfeits. Now, a recent story reveals that Amazon not only sells counterfeits frequently but benefits when fakes are sold and does little to rectify the problem.

Amazon ‘Thrives’ from Fakes

An article in the Los Angeles Times reported on fake products, including fake charging cables, and how they’ve affected legitimate businesses.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Not only has the platform avoided any serious backlash for allowing the sale of fake goods, it’s actually thrived from it, say more than two dozen brand owners, e-commerce consultants, attorneys, investigators and public policy experts.

Counterfeiters help pressure brands to sell their wares on the site. Companies that avoid Amazon risk letting counterfeiters determine how their goods appear to customers on the most influential e-commerce site — ceding control, for instance, of which pictures are used to promote a product and which colors and sizes are offered.

The spread of cheaper knockoffs can also put pressure on authentic sellers and brands to lower their prices, helping Amazon win more customers.

The company has resisted calls to do more to police its site and address claims by businesses that they are losing millions in lost sales and reputational harm, according to experts.

One of the biggest culprits is the third-party sellers on Amazon. When you buy something off Amazon, a third-party seller will often fulfill the orders, but they may be selling fakes. Even when Amazon itself fulfills the order, the products in their inventory may be fake without them knowing about it.

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Knives with Folding & Fixed Blade Versions

Designing a knife is hard, so imagine how difficult it is to successfully design a knife that can be made into both a fixed blade and a folding version without sacrificing comfort and functionality.

Well, the designers of these knives managed to do so with a aplomb.

Check out some of the best knife designs you can pick up in either a folding or fixed blade iteration.

Buck 110 & 101

Let’s start with an all-time knife: the Buck 110 Folding Hunter. This is one of the most successful pocket knife designs ever, becoming so ubiquitous that the style is simply known as a buck knife. So you might find it so surprising that it took Buck more than 50 years to turn the iconic knife into a fixed blade.

But that’s what they did with the Buck 101. It’s been met with very positive reviews.

Benchmade Adamas

Shane Sibert designed the 275 Adamas folding knife as a heavy-duty work knife. It’s frequently called one of the most durable work knives out there with its thick handle, liner, and blade. The success of the knife prompted Benchmade to add an automatic version as well as a fixed blade version.

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The Washington Post Publishes Article on Knife Rights

 

If you collect or enjoy knives, you’ve likely heard of the knife advocacy group started by knife designer Doug Ritter called Knife Rights.

Well, thanks to an article published in The Washington Post on September 15, people all over the country had the joy of learning all about the group’s effort to repeal restrictive knife laws in the United States.

I highly recommend reading the whole thing here.

An image of Todd Rathner of Knife Rights by Bridget Bennett for The Washington Post

Reporter Todd C. Frankel did a pretty good job presenting both sides of the argument and portraying the organization in a fairly positive light.

Here is a nice excerpt from the piece:

Ritter, 65, said that knives, like guns, should be considered arms protected by the Second Amendment. He doesn’t support any restriction on knives — not on switchblades or push daggers or even the ballistic knives that shoot like spears from a handle. Todd Rathner, director of legislative affairs for Knife Rights, holds a one-handed open knife during the Usual Suspect Gathering.

That’s become a winning argument. Twenty-one states have repealed or weakened their knife laws since 2010, many of them with bipartisan support, including Colorado, Michigan and Illinois. New York came close to doing the same last year. Ohio could be next. Texas passed its bill last year despite a high-profile stabbing death just days before lawmakers voted. And Knife Rights, with little financial backing, has been working behind the scenes to help make it happen.

“A lot of people said it would be impossible to repeal a switchblade law in any state. Insane. Tilting at windmills,” Ritter said. “Turns out they were wrong.”

The story was not without its faults though.

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Knife YouTubers You Must Subscribe To

YouTube is a strange and frightening place.

You have YouTubers I will never understand in a million years like Logan Paul and PewDiePie and then there are endlessly entertaining channels like CinemaSins and Bad Lip Reading. Alongside videos of makeup tutorials you have hypnotic 10-hour videos of the iconic “dental plan Lisa needs braces” gag from the Simpsons (I admit I watched two and a half hours of that video).

But for all the bizarrities and nonsense plaguing YouTube, there is a lively segment of gear reviews and channels devoted to knives and tangential topics.

So I did the unenviable task of choosing some of the best knife YouTubers every knife enthusiast should subscribe to.

Nick Shabazz

The faceless wonder, the man with the voice of an angel, the Z-Hunter fanboy (which may or may not be ironic anymore). It’s Nick Shabazz.

Nick Shabazz is one of my favorite knife YouTubers. His main focus is gear reviews — specifically knives but he’s branched out into other EDC items — but he also does immensely helpful disassembly videos and occasional live unboxings of awful knives. He looks at the good, the bad, and the ugly of all the items he gets for an unbiased view. On top of his fair take on the knives, he’s the master of puns.

For evidence, check out his review of the CRKT Wrinkle:

CutleryLover

While this post mostly features underdog and hidden talents, there are some people you just can’t ignore. One of those is cutleylover. Jeff has been on YouTube since 2008 and has amassed quite a following in the ensuing years. He has nearly 500,000 subscribers and more than 200 million views. Chances are you’ve seen one of his videos.

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Why Do People Hate Assisted-Openers?

If you were to peruse some popular knife forums, you’d think the invention of the assisted-opening mechanism was the worst thing to happen to the knife world.

The truth is that the average user could not care less whether the knife is spring-assisted. As long as it opens reliably and is relatively cheap, most people barley notice.

So, why do most knife nuts seem to hate assisted-opening knives with a passion? These are the most common arguments against assisted blades.

(Note: I’m being the devil’s advocate and citing some common arguments. I honestly don’t have a preference between assisted-openers and manual folders.)

1. Assisted-openers are dangerous

One of the biggest complaints about assisted-openers is that they’re dangerous. There are stories from people across the internet who say an assisted opener engaged while in the pocket. Those with flipper tabs are likely more dangerous because they can open up pretty easily when some pressure is applied to the edge of the closed knife. (This is a problem that can be mostly prevented with right-handed tip-down carry where the pocket would help keep it closed.)

I’ve carried assisted-openers before and never had one open. However, I have had an unassisted knife open slightly in my pocket. I don’t remember the circumstances that caused it, but any type of knife can be dangerous. Take a look at what could happen with an auto:

A first for me. Boker Kalashnikov opened in my pocket. from knives

Some have even complained that the strength of the assisted open is so powerful that the knife feels like it’s going to jump out of the hand.

2. Safety lock negates any advantages

To combat the first complaint, many knives come with safety mechanisms that keep the blade closed. For example, many Kershaw SpeedSafe models have a little peg that slides behind the blade to keep it from opening up accidentally. While it does increase the safety of the knife, it also counteracts the quickness and accessibility of the knife.

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10 Cool Knife Mods From Reddit

Reddit is a fascinating place. It is an outlet where people with very specific interests interact with one another and share ideas, memes, images, and whatever else they want.

There are also a few fantastic subreddits dedicated to knives — /knives and the sometimes superior /knifeclub.

After lurking on these subreddits for years, I thought it’d be cool to show some of the best or most creative knife mods people have shown on the site. Check ’em out.

1. Toothpick Mod

One of the best things about the Victorinox cellidor scales is the assortment of tools within the scales, specifically the tweezers and toothpick.  Reddit user zuriel2089 modified the G-10 scales of a Spyderco Tenacious to fit a Victorinox toothpick. I personally find the tweezers more useful, but this is something you can do to many knives.

2. Front Flipper Mod

Front flippers have grown in popularity the past few years. Although Spyderco has yet to jump on the front flipper bandwagon, one Redditer bought a Lil Native modified to work as a front flipper. It looks like the scales were sanded down to only reveal the tang. Seems to work surprisingly well.

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Best US-Made Knives Under $35

It should be everyone’s goal to buy American-made products to support manufacturing and jobs in the country. However, prices and quality of knives compared to foreign competition can be tough to ignore.

But, if you think you can’t get a solid American-made knife for less than $35, you’re sorely mistaken.

Here is a selection of 10 knives you can pick up for less than $35.

Gerber E-Z Out Skeleton

After some missteps over the years, Gerber has really righted the ship by focusing on more US-made knives and ensuring classics are well cared for. One thing Gerber does very well is provide US-made knives at reasonable prices. Just take the Gerber E-Z Out Skeleton, for example.

The E-Z Out line has been a staple of Gerber for decades. This is a highly versatile knife with a long 3.52-inch blade and a polycarbonate handle. Along with a lockback mechanism, this knife is an easy and reliable EDC folder.

Case Sod Buster

This is the first of many Case knives to grace this list. The Sod Buster is a legendary slip joint pattern that has captured the hearts and minds of knife enthusiasts everywhere. The knife has a single blade that measures about 3.5 inches. The handle is black impact resistant synthetic material.

KA-BAR BK13 Becker Remora

Not all cheap US-made knives have to be folders. KA-BAR and Becker make an excellent lightweight fixed blade that can work as an everyday carry. The total length is only about 5.12 inches with a blade of about 2.3 inches — all made with black-coated 1095 Cro-Van steel. Thanks to a skeletonized handle, the knife almost disappears at less than 2 ounces.

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Ax-Throwing Gaining Popularity with New Indoor Venues

The art of knife throwing (and ax throwing) has always felt on the cusp of mainstream.

A slew of soon-to-be-opening indoor ax-throwing venues might just help provide that boost the pastime needs to be as common and prevalent as mini golf, bowling, or billiards.

Patt Johnson of the Des Moines Register wrote a great feature (filled with some solid puns) on three new businesses opening up in the Des Moines area over the summer dedicated to ax throwing.

Here’s more about the business called Lumber Axe soon to open in downtown Des Moines by Aaron Coy:

Ax-throwing centers allow participants to pick out a two-handed ax or hatchet and launch it about 12 feet at a bulls-eye.

Throwing lanes are generally divided with chain-link fencing to protect throwers in nearby alleys.

Ax-throwing costs vary, but generally, an hour of casual throwing starts around $20 for a group of eight. League fees can be about $135 for a season. Ax prices range greatly but start around $20.

Coy is opening a center with four single-throwing lanes and six double lanes. The business will also include laser tag, virtual reality stations and two bars.

These centers are meant to rival pool halls or bowling alleys with concessions and even alcoholic drinks.

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