The Cutting Edge

The official blog of Knife Depot

20 Knife Gift Ideas Under $100

This post was updated in 2020.

Our suggestions for gift ideas at certain price ranges continues with 20 knife gift ideas under $100.

This list only features knives in the $50 to $100 price range. If you’re interested in the $20 to $50 range, check out our 20 knife gift ideas under $50 post. For prices under that, check out our 20 knife gift ideas under $20.

These recommendations cover the full gamut of styles, designs, and functions, so if you can’t find something to your satisfaction, you’re trying too hard.

1. Spyderco Para 3 Lightweight

The first few iterations of this list featured the iconic Benchmade Mini Griptilian here. Unfortunately, rising prices have pushed this still great knife off the list. But the replacement may be a better overall knife.

The Para 3 Lightweight is a new offering from Spyderco with a great design, quality materials, and is made in the United States. The blade is under two inches and locks into place with the Compression Lock.

2. Spyderco Delica 4

Spyderco makes a ton of great knives at a budget cost, but for a true representation of the quality and design elements of the brand (aside from the first knife on this list), there’s the Delica. This is a truly beloved knife from the knife community because of its versatile size, excellent construction, and interesting design.

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20 Knife Gift Ideas Under $50

Note: Post updated in 2020.

If you’re like me, trying to find a gift is the worst. Fortunately, for you, helping you find the perfect gift is part of my job.

I’ve written about 20 different knife-related gifts for under $20 with some great options. But, if your budget for a good friend or little brother is a little higher, we got you covered.

Here are 20 knife-related gift ideas for under $50. These include some of the best-sellers at Knife Depot and products people have been excited about recently.

1. Spyderco Efficient

When we first made this list a few years back, the Spyderco Tenacious was one of the top picks for knives under $50, but its price just recently went over the $50 mark.

However, there’s a knife dubbed the Tenacious killer that’s just as good (if not better) that comes in under $50: the Spyderco Efficient.

The Efficient has a smaller 3-inch blade but it feels just as big as the larger Tenacious thanks to a finger choil and excellent grip.

2. Kershaw Reverb

The Reverb is an interesting little knife. This futuristic-looking folder was named one of the top sellers of 2017 by Knife News, and it’s not hard to see why. The small 2.5-inch blade is versatile and its machined recess allows for easy, one-handed opening.

A combo G-10 and carbon fiber handle adds some texture to the grip while a carabiner in the back allows for versatile carry. The best part about this knife is you can really take it anywhere you go.

3. Schrade Old Timer 6OT Golden Bear

From the modern to the classic, the next item under $50 is the Old Timer 6OT Golden Bear from Schrade. I’ve always been a big fan of Old Timer knives — the saw cut Delrin handles and the brass bolsters/pins give this knife a look that harkens back to the days of old.

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20 Knife Gift Ideas For Under $20

Note: Post updated in 2020.

Finding a gift for someone is stress, whether it’s a small Christmas gift for a coworker, a graduation gift for your little brother, or a present for Father’s Day.

But don’t worry; we have your back with a good knife.

Here’s a look at 20 easy knife-related gift ideas that are sure to get some genuine smiles and thanks. The best part is that everything’s under $20.

1. HallMark Money Clip

We’ll start with an easy one—the HallMark Money Clip. This is one of our bestsellers at the moment. Why? This is an excellent all-around EDC tool with the dual purpose of being a money clip. That alone makes this gift a no-brainer.

It’s one of the least expensive knives on this list too.

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2. Kershaw Shuffle

Kershaw makes a darn good knife, and you can see its eye for design with the Kershaw Shuffle. This $19.99 knife is an excellent stocking stuffer thanks to its compact design. But this hugely popular knife isn’t just for show. It’s a tough utility knife with a built-in bottle opener and screwdriver/lanyard hole in the handle. The interesting K-texture is grippy and durable.

The Shuffle comes in a few different colors, but our favorite aside from the standard model featured here is the Black Shuffle.

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3. Cold Steel Karambit

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You can get more than just folders for under $20 too. Check out the Cold Steel FGX Grivory Karambit. The karambit is designed after the claws of large cats found in the jungles of Indonesia. It’s primarily a fighting or self-defense tool, but it also makes a great addition to any collection.

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10 Badass Knives with Blue Handles

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This post was originally published back in Jan 2016 but was updated in November 2020 to include newer models.

Not fond of all the black-handled knives out there? Well, we’ve got a series of posts for you.

We’re exploring some of the best knives in different handle colors. Knives with orange handles and knives with green handles are already in the bag, so we thought blue-handled knives were in order.

You can find other blue knives by searching at knife-depot.com, but hopefully some of these will inspire your own blue period.

Kershaw Scallion

Let’s kick things off with a great little EDC from Kershaw. The Scallion is a Ken Onion design (it has his signature angles all over it) with a 2.25-inch assisted opening blade made from 420HC stainless steel. This iteration comes with a navy blue anodized aluminum handle, which stays surprisingly vivid through use and abuse.

Victorinox Midnite Manager, Sapphire

When you think of Victorinox Swiss Army knives, you likely imagine the iconic red scales. The success of the knives has led to tons of variations and colors.

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Top 6 Titanium Spyderco Knives

The Native 5 Fluted Titanium photographed by the spydercollector

The Native 5 Fluted Titanium photographed by the spydercollector

This article was first published back in May 2016. It was updated in October 2020 to reflect newer models.

Behold the wonders of titanium.

This metal alloy has so many advantages in its favor—from superior corrosion resistance to excellent durability—that it’s a coveted material. Even though it’s heavier than other materials like carbon fiber, titanium is surprisingly lightweight for a strong metal. The amalgamation of all these characteristics makes titanium one hell of a material for knife handles.

No company has done a better job at making titanium handles than Spyderco. So, we decided to take a look at six Spyderco knives that expertly utilized titanium handles.

1. Spyderco Delica 4, Damascus

Let’s kick things off with a classic: the Spyderco Delica 4. This iteration of the iconic model that turned the knife world upside down features a simple titanium handle with a bead-blasted matte finish. Its good-looking titanium handle probably takes a backseat to the Damascus blade with a core of VG-10, but the handle deserves some love.

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2. Spyderco SpydieChef

Back when this article was first published, the Spyderco SpydieChef wasn’t out yet. Since its release, this titanium folder has vaulted up to become not just one of Spyderco’s best titanium knives but one of Spyderco’s best knives ever.

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15 Striking Orange Knives

This article was originally published in 2015 but has been updated to include more and newer models.

If you look at all the colors that knives and their handles come in, you’ll notice a trend. Yup, they’re pretty much all black. Black is a popular color for knives because of its lowkey appearance and versatility.

While the majority of people opt for those sexy black knives, it’s the other colors that don’t get enough love. So we decided to do a series of posts dedicated to those knives in different colors.

So today we’re looking at orange knives.

1. KA-BAR Dozier

First up on the list is the KA-BAR Bob Dozier Folding Hunter. This iteration of the popular EDC features the blaze orange handle with a black blade and thumb stud. This blade is usually considered one of the best budget EDC knives around because of its reasonable 3-inch blade and relatively low cost.

2. ESEE-4

Next is the ESEE-4 with Orange Handle. The ESEE-4 was previously named a Badass Knife of the Week because of its extreme durability. The knife’s bright orange G-10 handle scales are brought to life even more by the green blade.

3. Spyderco Endura 4

The Spyderco Endura 4 was included on our last of 20 most iconic knives ever. This is the same Endura 4 we all know and love—3.75-inch VG-10 blade—but with orange FRN handle scales.

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10 Best Gerber Knives

This post was originally published in May 2018 but was update in September 2020 to include newer models.

Gerber has a long history dating back to 1939. The brand has evolved over the years — undergoing some ups and downs as some of the best designers and knifemakers around left the company to start their own ventures.

It’s been a rocky two decades, but Gerber seems to be on firm footing with some very well-designed models. Here is a look at Gerber’s 10 best knives currently in production.

Note: As always, these best-of lists are highly subjective. However, I do my due diligence through personal experience as well as consensus from around the internet. These lists will always skew toward the tried-and-true models, but new models will always make the jump.

Gerber LMF II Infantry

Gerber has remade itself over the past few years thanks to three very reliable (and pretty similar) fixed blades. The Gerber LMF II has an undisputed spot on this list for good reason. Gerber says the knife was originally designed to free an aircrew from a downed aircraft, and it remains an adaptable fixed blade that can be used in all types of situations.

The blade is 4.84 inches made from 420HC stainless steel. It has partial serrations and glass-filled nylon with TPV overmold handles.

Gerber Gator

This list is heavily populated with perennial favorites and the Gerber Gator is no exception. It was first introduced in the early ’90s when it was named “Most Innovative Knife of the Year” at the 1991 Blade Show. Despite being so old, the knife remains one of the best Gerber has to offer.

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12 Best UK-Legal Pocket Knives

This post was originally published in April 2017 but was updated to include newer models.

There’s nothing like living in the great United States of America, but sometimes you simply have to get out to see the world. Unfortunately, not all of your knives can make the trip with you.

If you’re traveling to the United Kingdom (or live there), your knives will be heavily regulated and subject to confiscation if they don’t meet stringent requirements (and sometimes if they do).

Despite bin campaigns, increasing regulations on knife purchases, and a general demonization of all bladed tools, knife and gun crime saw a significant spike last year. That means knives will be under even more scrutiny.

You can still carry knives in the United Kingdom under very specific circumstances.

UK Knife Laws

Before we get into the actual knives you can carry, here are the basic knife laws in the UK.

“It is illegal to carry a knife in public without good reason – unless it’s a knife with a folding blade 3 inches long (7.62cm) or less.” It seems like it is therefore legal to carry a larger knife or even a fixed blade as long as it’s for “good reason” but I wouldn’t push my luck.

All locking knives are banned, including those in multitools (RIP Victorinox SwissChamp). There’s also a host of banned knives and weapons in the books, such as butterfly knives, flick knives, gravity knives, disguised knives, zombie knives (even those that fall under the regular regulations!), and more.

With that in mind, here are 12 UK-legal knives.*

*It’s very possible these knives will still be taken away so exercise caution no matter what.

1. Spyderco UK Penknife

Let’s start with the quintessential UK knife: the Spyderco UK Penknife. This knife typically tops all of these UK-legal lists because Spyderco designed this knife specifically with those laws in mind. The UK Penknife uses quality materials with a 2.93-inch CTS BD1 steel blade and an FRN handle. It weighs only 1.7 ounces and represents the best a typical US-made Spyderco has to offer.

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Best Everyday Carry Eating Tools

Preparation is the key to survival.

Imagine this scenario: You’re lost out in the wilderness for days surviving on berries and wildflowers when all of a sudden you come across a fresh and perfectly made banana split. But all you have are your hands to eat the delicious and potentially life-saving ice cream creation, so you pass it along and succumb to starvation hours later.

If only you had a tool for eating something on the go.

Sure, this tale is grossly exaggerated (and you would just use your hands to eat and deal with the mess after), but it also serves as a cautionary story about the need to be prepared for everything and that includes eating like a civilized being.

Fortunately for those of us who like to eat on the go without getting our hands dirty, manufacturers make a range of tools designed to serve as utensils in any situation. Here are some of the best.

CRKT Eat’N Tool

Let’s start off with one of the most famous eating tools: the CRKT Eat’N Tool. This little guy has become one of the gold standards for what a simple yet effective eating tool should be. Designed by Liong Mah (of CRKT Remedy fame), the Eat’N Tool has a spork setup with some extras like a bottle opener, screwdrivers, pry bar, and metric wrenches.

Thanks to the cutout in the middle, the tool is surprisingly comfortable to use. It weighs 1.5 ounces and is meant to attach to your keychains for those times you’re stuck without a spoon. If you want a longer one, you can grab the CRKT Eat’N Tool XL.

KA-BAR Tactical Spork

So the name is a little silly, but the concept of the KA-BAR Tactical Spork is great. This is a compact eating utensil made from black Grilamid and looks like a classic spork when closed. But when you need a knife, it splits into two for a knife and fork set.

This tool is made in the United States and has an overall length of nearly 7 inches. This is a good camping set or something you can easily stick in your bag or EDC kit.

Kershaw Ration

The Kershaw Ration shies away from the spork, which does have some limitations and makes a tool with a fork and a spoon (as well as a cap lifter). The stainless steel tool is compact and weighs 1.1 ounces. It also has a cool carabiner to easily attach to a backpack or lunch bag for when you need it.

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Best 1st Response Rescue Knives

Disaster can strike anytime anywhere.

Your car might suddenly careen off the road before landing upside down in a creek or your clothing could get trapped in an escalator unexpectedly.

In either situation, only a knife can save you from certain doom. While any knife can save someone in a pinch, manufacturers have seized on the opportunity to create models specifically designed to aid in a rescue.

So we compiled a list of 20 of the best rescue knives. These come in all designs and styles, from small folders to massive fixed blades.

Take a look and let us know your favorites.

1. Kershaw Funxion

The Kershaw Funxion EMT is an updated version of the knife with a feature-rich design. The knife comes with a 3-inch partially serrated blade that deploys with the SpeedSafe assisted-opening mechanism.

Hidden within the K-texture GFN handle is a carabiner clip, hex wrench, cord cutter, glass breaker tip, and screwdriver tip. This is a nice multitool to carry that would come in handy in the event of an emergency. This knife is particularly useful for an EMT or medic.

2. Spyderco Assist

Spyderco makes some bizarre knives, but there’s no denying they’re great at their job. The Assist is no exception.

According to Spyderco, the knife was designed for emergency, fire, and rescue professionals (as well as civilians who like to be prepared). The 3.687-inch VG-10 blade features a blunt tip and a partially serrated edge. Along with the Round Hole, the knife features a protrusion that further aids in easy one-handed opening.

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10 Best Spyderco Knives

This post was originally published August 2018 but was updated in August 2020.

When Sal and Gail Glesser started a company in the 1970s based around a device called The Portable Hand — which could assist jewelers and other professionals who work with small parts — they likely never imagined it would become one of the premier knife brands in the world.

But, more than 40 years later, the company known as Spyderco is a top-tier brand with some of the best and most revolutionary knife designs ever made.

So, as we’ve been doing, we decided to go through the 10 best Spyderco knives currently in production. You’ll notice this list is heavily populated with classics, but that’s partially thanks to Spyderco’s CQI (constant quality improvement) program that improves upon existing designs. That’s how you get perfection.

Here are the 10 best Spyderco knives you can get right now.

Spyderco Para Military 2

Let’s get the Spyderco Para Military 2 out of the way. The PM2 is almost universally known as not just the best Spyderco model but the best pocket knife available.

So how does a knife like the PM2 capture the hearts and minds of people everywhere? It has a nearly 3.5-inch blade with a functional design and quality S30V steel. On top of that, it stays engaged with the easy-to-use and reliable Compression Lock. The G-10 handle had been improved from the first generation for better ergonomics.

This knife has pretty much everything you can ask for in a larger folder.

Spyderco Dragonfly 2

What the Para Military 2 is to larger folders, the Dragonfly 2 is to smaller folders. Pound for pound, the DF2 is one of the best small folders you can buy.

Although the Dragonfly isn’t widely accepted as the best small folder, some of the most trustworthy names in the knife community swear by this knife and for good reason. The leaf-shaped blade is only 2.25 inches, but the whole design and ability to choke up on the blade make it feel larger than it is. It locks into place with a backlock mechanism while the bi-drectional textured FRN handle scales are grippy and reliable.

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10 Best CRKT Knives

This post was originally posted in August 2018 and update in July 2020.

Formally known as Columbia River Knife & Tool, CRKT is a relatively new company in terms of big knife brands, having only been established in 1994.

However, over the two decades the company has been around, it’s put out hundreds of different knives. There’s a lot to love about CRKT, from its truly innovative designs to its collaborations with some of the top knifemakers. Unfortunately, the use of inexpensive materials leave a lot to be desired by the knife community.

Picking the 10 best CRKT knives was easy at first, until I realized all the knives I was forgetting. The company puts out dozens of new knives every year and discontinues a ton. Unlike many of the other brands, this list is a mixture of new and old.

Let us know if you think we missed any.

CRKT M16

We’ll start with the flagship series from CRKT: the M16. The late great Kit Carson, who pioneered the flipper tab, helped propel CRKT to where it is today, thanks to his M16 series. His knife was named one of the 10 best tactical knives of the decade by Blade Magazine, and the CRKT interpretation is nothing to scoff at.

These days, there are dozens of variations on the M16, so much so that it’s hard to sort out all the models available and the confusing numbering system. The M16-14SFG is a crowd favorite.

CRKT Drifter

The Drifter is an unlikely addition to this list. In many ways, the Drifter is an unspectacular folding knife, but it is exactly the knife that anyone can use and enjoy. In fact, the knife was named the best folding knife for the masses by The Wirecutter. It’s dirt cheap, features a reasonable sub 3-inch blade length, and uses a no-nonsense liner lock.

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10 Folding Karambits For EDC

The karambit is an ancient agricultural tool created by the Minangkabau people of Indonesia and modeled after the claws of big cats. These days, the karambit has entered the knife realm as a versatile self-defense tool that allows for different fighting techniques, thanks to its curved design and finger ring.

While karambits are probably best known for their self-defense qualifications, they can also make great everyday carry tools. Not only do they have comfortable, ergonomic designs but the blades also sometimes work much better than straight edged blades in certain situations (like cutting rope, for example).

While you may want to carry a secondary straight-edged knife for good measure, these five folding karambit knives have worked well as EDCs for many people.

1. Smith & Wesson Extreme Ops Karambit

I’ll start things off with one of the most understated folding karambits. The Smith & Wesson Extreme Ops Karambit features a 3.5-inch blade with less of a curve than other models. This gives the blade more versatility than a pure karambit style blade and reduces the overall “scare” factor.

The knife still retains the claw-like design with G-10 handle scales and a stainless steel finger ring. The blade opens via ambidextrous thumb studs and stays engaged with a liner lock. There’s a reason this knife is a best-seller at Knife Depot.

2. Cold Steel Tiger Claw

Sure, Cold Steel is known for its aggressive designs and focus on self-defense, but this Andrew Demko creation is actually made with everyday carry in mind. The Cold Steel Tiger Claw was designed after Demko aimed to make a multipurpose folder that could perform while he was on the job as an electrician or engineer.

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15 Knives That Weigh Under 2 Ounces

To some people, weight is no issue in a knife. They will happily EDC a large half-pound folder made of steel because they love the design or appreciate the heft.

For others, even just a few extra ounces can feel like extra pounds when they’re carrying it around all day every day.

If you’re a weight watcher, then you’re in luck. We’ve been working on posts about knives within certain weight limits. The first post from a few months back dealt with knives that weighed under an ounce. This post focuses on the best knives weighing under 2 ounces (more specifically 1-2 ounces).

See which knives made the cut.

CRKT Eros

The Eros from CRKT is a thin folder that is easily identifiable as a Ken Onion design. CRKT calls the original the one that pioneered the “gentleman’s tactical” category. While you can find a version closer to the original, this upgraded Eros boasts better material and a lighter weight.

The blade is 3 inches of Acuto 440 steel while the handle is 6AL4V titanium with a frame lock.

Weight: 1.4 oz

Kershaw Launch 4

California legal automatic knives are becoming increasingly popular, and the most popular in this category is the Kershaw Launch 4. Although the knife is small with a 1.9-inch automatic blade, it makes an excellent EDC.

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Common Mistakes That Knife Collectors Make When Buying New Knives

Knife collecting is one of the most rewarding and addicting hobbies today. It can also be expensive! The record for a collectible knife goes to the Gem of the Orient at $2.1 million.

Most collectors don’t dream of spending that much, but knives can still run in the thousands of dollars. Knife collectors know what it’s like to see what looks like the perfect knife and buy it on the spot. Sadly, this often leads to buyer’s remorse as the knife doesn’t live up to its promise.

Are you looking to add some new or custom knives to your collection? Beware of these five common mistakes that have been the downfall of new and veteran collectors alike.

Knife Collectors’ Top 5 Mistakes

Whether you’ve just started your collection or have been working on it for years, there are a few pitfalls that any avid collector can fall into. But following this guide on collecting mistakes can steer you towards a collection that fits your purpose and your budget.

1. Buying in Haste, Repenting in Leisure

It happens to every knife collector at some point: love at first sight. You see a knife that you just know, in your gut, you can’t live without.

This is the time to take a very deep breath and talk yourself down off the ledge. Buying a knife in the heat of the moment is a perfect way to throw your money away.

Take a moment to think about the purpose of your collection and whether the knife fits. Are you collecting for investment? Without doing your due diligence it’s impossible to know that this knife will increase in value anytime soon. 

Or maybe you know that you’re looking to add an Old Timer to your collection, but a newer style switchblade catches your eye. You may end up with a sub-standard knife and still need to fill that hole in your collection.

In most cases, the knife isn’t going anywhere just yet. Take your time to think twice about the knife. This will help you avoid a costly mistake.

Which brings us to the next downfall: 

2. Neglecting Your Research

With all of the myriad information on the internet today, there is no excuse for buying a knife without knowing all about it first. This is a key rule in any kind of collecting. Knife collecting can be fun and rewarding, but buying a knife is an investment and must be done responsibly.

There are so many factors to consider when buying a knife. Ask yourself the important questions below before buying. Much of this information is easily accessible online.

First, look into the knife maker. Where have they worked before? Are their knives well-regarded?

Some knife makers have a large following due to their charismatic or storied past. However, that doesn’t mean that the knife is top quality. It still might not be the right knife for you.

Search online for the right pricing. Is the knife overpriced? If you’re shopping online, research whether there is a store or show where you can hold the knife before buying. 

Finally, is this knife a good investment? Some knives may be trending but will fail to increase in value in the long run. It’s hard to say exactly what will happen, but doing your research ahead of time can help. 

3. Ignoring the Face

You see a knife you love, but does it have a recognizable face? The face of a knife refers to the mark or branding on the blade. Every reputable knife maker has a distinctive mark that you will be able to recognize immediately.

If you don’t see a face, or it is not easily identifiable, the knife may be a knock-off. This kind of knife will not resell as well as an original. Save up your money for the real thing.

Any maker or collector worth his salt will tell you that the face is an integral part of the knife. It tells the story of the maker’s brand, while also signaling its worth to the buying public.  Know the face before you buy it! 

4. Blowing Your Budget

Have you set a budget for your next knife purchase? Not doing so is one of the big mistakes collectors make. The other is not sticking to a set budget.

The budget will be different depending on the collector. Knives can range from tens of dollars to thousands of dollars. Every collector will not be able to spend that amount on a purchase.

Shopping without a set budget in place can lead you to a purchase you’ll regret. The high-ticket item might not fit in your collection, or it could prevent you from buying more knives in the timeframe you’d hoped.

Going above your budget is tempting, but I refer you back to mistake #1. Collecting is a long-term proposition, you’re in this for the end game of a beautiful and valuable collection. It’s not just about one knife!

Take a breath, save your money, and come back when you’ve got the budget for it. The challenge of setting a budget will make every purchase that much more meaningful.

5. Missing the Shows

If you’re not attending knife shows or conventions, you’re missing out. Shows are not just about buying your next knife.

At shows, you can connect with makers, sellers, and other collectors. Other knife enthusiasts are a great source of information and leads for where to buy your next knife.  

Find the next trade show near you to start out, and who knows where you’ll go next? Remember to add show costs to your collecting budget!

Always Check With the Experts

While these mistakes can set back any collector, there is one rule you should always follow. Check with the experts for guidance on your next purchase.

We know knives and knife collectors. At Knife-Depot.com you can shop our store and also find handy buying guides for any kind of knife collector. 

10 Badass Knife Money Clips

This post was updated in April 2020 with more current models. It was originally published in August 2017.

Wallets are large, uncomfortable and bulky (if you’re lucky). But if you’re the kind of guy who’s bent on keeping your pockets as unobtrusive as possible and aren’t bogged down by rewards cards from places like Petco or Panera Bread, ditch the wallet for something a little more discreet and fashionable: a money clip.

The money clip is straightforward, unassuming, and typically boasts a nice metal design that’s more durable than any leather wallet. And to kill two birds with one stone, many money clips also double as a pocket knife.

To help you in your search for a new money clip and pocket knife, we’ve broken down some of the most interesting knife money clips.

SOG Cash Card

Money and a knife. Is there anything else you really need to carry? The SOG Cash Card was designed with this purpose in mind. It features a minimalist design with cutouts that keep the weight at a reasonable 2 ounces. The best part is the functional 2.75-inch liner locking blade. The handle is stainless steel.

Victorinox Swiss Army Money Clip

The Swiss Army knife is the ultimate multitool, so it makes perfect sense to attach a money clip to it and make it a full-fledged multitool that’s the only thing in your pocket. The Victorinox Money Clip model has a blade, scissors, and nail file with cleaner. This model actually comes in three colors.

CRKT K.I.S.S.

The late Ed Halligan wanted a knife that kept to the motto “Keep It Super Simple” (or Keep It Simple Stupid), so he made the K.I.S.S. The knife was picked up by CRKT and was unveiled at the Shot Show in 1997. It became an instant it. This design is as basic as they come.

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The Different Types of Kitchen Knives Currently Available for Purchase

Are you a kitchen wizard? Someone who wields a kitchen knife as if it were part of your hand?

Perhaps you’re more of an amateur—someone who aspires to culinary greatness, but still has a few things to learn.

Either way, you must be familiar with the different types of kitchen knives!

We think you’ll appreciate the array of kitchen knives and accessories we discuss in this article, so keep reading to learn more.

How Did Kitchen Knives Come to Be?

Like many things today, our modern kitchen knives have their origins in prehistoric times and have been refined ever since. Just as knives are now, prehistoric and ancient knives were at least as connected to fighting and warfare as they were to food preparation.

We find it surprising that some kitchen knives from earlier eras and cultures are making a comeback in the workshops of modern-day craftspeople. Knives made of wood and ceramic materials are some examples.

We’re here to discuss more traditional kitchen knives, though, so let’s move on.

Types of Kitchen Knives

Some categories of kitchen knives—for example, the paring knife of the chef’s knife—are present in nearly every well-furnished kitchen. However, there might be a few that are new to you as well.

Chefs’ Knives

Chefs’ knives are the kitchen workhorse. If you’re a serious cook, your chef knife (or knives) will be in the dish rack drying more than it’s in the knife block. This is a large, heavy knife that’s very versatile. It can cut meat, vegetables, and a lot more.

Bread Knives

Speaking of workhorse knives, bread knives are one of a few knives that you could find in anyone’s kitchen, whether cooks or non-cooks. Who doesn’t eat bread, after all? Everyone knows that truly delicious bread needs a sharp knife to cut it.

Paring Knives

Another workhorse knife (of a different sort, though) is the paring knife. This handy knife is used for small tasks like chopping herbs, slicing carrots or pepperoni, or even opening envelopes (be sure to wash the knife afterward, though).

Santoku Knives

These knives, which originated in Japan, are somewhat new to North America. They’ve certainly caught on, though! Santoku knives come in different styles and sizes and have uses that parallel those of Western knives.

However, the Santoku isn’t as tapered as most Western knives, and its blade has vertical indentations that help it move smoothly through some denser foods. Perhaps, too, we like it because of its distinctive look!

Steak Knives

Steak knives come in sets (usually of four or eight) and are popular gifts. Of course, these are excellent for cutting steak and other thick cuts of meat. We suspect a lot of people (like ourselves) use these for cutting apples and other everyday needs.

Boning Knives

This odd-looking and somewhat uncommon knife has a narrow blade that’s curved at the base. You use it to remove bones as well as butterflying cuts of meat. Boning knives are available in several different styles and sizes.

Fillet Knives

Fillet knives look a bit like boning knives but have even narrower blades. These blades are also flexible, making it much easier to work with fish than it would be otherwise. Like boning knives, these are unlikely to be found in every kitchen.

Cleavers and Butcher Knives

If knives are scary in general, a meat cleaver will scare the *#%$ out of you! This is one big, heavy monster of a knife that’s used by butchers or anyone with a lot of large pieces of meat (or an entire carcass) to cut.

The butcher knife is more benign and ordinary-looking and probably is more likely to appear in the everyday person’s kitchen.

Kitchen Shears

Kitchen shears are actually two knives working in sync. While you aren’t likely to cut your finger by touching one of the blades, the simple-machine mechanism of the shears allows them to cut through some of the toughest and most fibrous materials you use in the kitchen—from vegetable stocks to heavy twine,

Carving Knives and Forks

Carving knives and forks are the famous pairing that makes its appearance every year at the Thanksgiving table, or perhaps for a pork or beef roast for a different holiday.

The knife-fork combination is meant to anchor the uncut meat as well as place the slices on a platter.

All-Purpose or Utility Knives

You can never have enough all-purpose or utility knives in your kitchen—or utility room, workshop, garage, or anywhere you need a good knife with a solid handle. These come in lots of different shapes, sizes, and even colors.

Cheese Knives

Cheese knives are all over the map in terms of shape and design. This, no doubt, is because cheeses come in so many different shapes and textures, from soft brie to hard Parmesan.

We think the unusual designs also make them conversation pieces for dinner guests. There are other explanations out there, too, though.

Specialty or Exotic Knives

This last kitchen knife category is kind of a catch-all for any knives that don’t quite fit the other categories. An online search fora phrase such as “unusual-looking kitchen knives” should turn up some intriguing specimens for your enjoyment.

Not Exactly Kitchen Knives

We can’t end this article without mentioning both the array of knife sharpeners, holders, rolls, and racks. These are in addition to the many kitchen tools that aren’t knives per se but do have sharp blades.

Here, we’re referring to items like mincers, vegetable peelers, blenders, food processors, coffee or spice grinders, choppers, and an array of other utensils and appliances that owe their essential functions to the invention of the knife.

Functional Yet Objects of Beauty Nonetheless

Whether you’re a professional chef, a home chef or someone who dabbles in the kitchen, it isn’t hard to be fascinated by the many types of kitchen knives that are out there.

Don’t ever take your kitchen knives for granted. For one thing, they’re an investment—maybe collected one-by-one over decades or received as a gift all (or most) at the same time.

Your knives need regular cleaning and sharpening. If you do this conscientiously, they will last and serve you long enough for you to hand down to your grandchildren or grandnieces and nephews someday.

Still, you shouldn’t forget about our extensive collection of knives—kitchen knives and others. There’s always something you’ll want to add to your collection, and we probably have it available.

If you’d like to find out more about iconic knives you need to own, check out our blog post

The 7 Best Automatic Knives Available on the Market in 2020

Do you find it hard to find the right blade for you? When it comes to finding the best automatic knives for your toolkit, you may be greeted with hundreds of options that make choosing the right one difficult.

We are here to make your process easier by telling you what the best automatic knives on the market are. To see what knives made our list keeps reading below. 

1. Buck – 110 Auto Knife

The Buck 110 Auto Knife will engage with a simple push of a button. Buck’s blades date back to 1963 and have since become a leading name in the knife industry. All Buck blades are great for outdoorsmen and those looking for a sturdy knife. 

The 110 has a 420HC blade that is ready pretty quickly and efficiently. This blade features brass bolsters and the classic Macassar Ebony Dymondwood handles that the non-automatic 110 has. 

2. Kershaw Knives Auto – Tex Knife Sharpener

The Tex Knife Sharpener is made of 600-grit diamond-impregnated steel and has a blade length of 3-1/8 inches. To engage this blade all you have to do is push the button and instantly the sharpening steel will respond. 

In an instant, you can have the tools to sharpen any knife which makes this great for hunters that may need to sharpen their blade in the woods. This sharpener is inspired by the quick action of a switchblade so it will be ready right away and then can be easily retracted by pulling the button.

The handle is glass-filled and has a soft-touch for a secure and steady grip. This is a great tool to have on you at all times and will be ready for any of your blades that need some TLC. 

3. Gerber – DMF Modified Clip Point Auto Knife

The Gerber DMF Modified Clip Point Auto Knife is a great knife for those that are ambidextrous because it can fit comfortably in either hand. The DMF stands for Dual Multi-Function and it lives up to its name when it comes to deploying the knife in your weak hand while wearing gloves.

It has a fully automatic S30V blade that has amazing edge retention and corrosion resistance. The handle is a G10 handle and will provide you with lightweight and strength. 

This blade is fully automatic and comes with a large lanyard hole for cord or webbing. The blade length is 3.5 inches and when it’s closed the knife measures at 4.45 inches. 

4. Kershaw Launch 8 – Stiletto Auto Knife – Model 7150

The Stiletto Auto Knife was inspired by the look of classic Italian stilettos. This particular design brings this classic look at the present and modernizes it for a new age.

You will find that this blade has symmetrical lines of a stiletto but in a push-button automatic knife. This blade is only 2.4 ounces meaning it’s very lightweight and easy to carry. 

The modern look to this knife isn’t the only new age thing about it, it’s even made out of some modern material. Carbon fiber and aluminum come together to create this beauty to help make it lightweight and also to appear to collectors. 

When looking at the blade you’ll notice that it is CPM 154 with a stonewashed finish. This steel has a more uniform distribution of carbides which means it will take and hold a superior edge. This blade offers good corrosion and wear resistance meaning it’s a pretty tough knife. 

5. S.A.H. – Safety Auto Hook Knife

The Saftey Auto Hook knife or S.A.H. is a blade that enhances the benefits of Gerber knife technology. This blade has the addition of a DZUS fastener and flat driver. It also includes a safety auto hook.

This particular model is great for any warfighter because they can slash away riggings and harnesses with just the push of a button. Troops can also take benefit in the safety auto hook to help exit downed aircraft and damaged cars. During any emergency situation the safety auto hook will help to save your life and is good to even keep in the family car.

The blade length on his knife is 3.6 inches. When the blade is away, the knife measures in at 5.1 inches. It’s made in the USA and has a G 10 stainless steel handle. 

6. Spring Assist – Legal Auto Knife – Winged Skull Fighter Green

If you like a knife that makes a statement then look no further than the Winged Skull Fighter Green. The handle is a bright green that shows a skull, definitely catching eyes of collectors and non-collectors alike.

This kife has a fast action spring assist that will give you a tactical advantage. It has a sharpened 440 stainless steel blade with a black finish. When opened this model measures at 8 1/4 inches. When closed it is 5 inches. 

7. Remington Escape Black Sheepfoot & Auto Seat Belt

The Remington Premier Rescue Escape knives are created and crafted by master Italian knife makes. Each design is unique and functional.

This blade is made for the most demanding situations and is very dependable. This is a great tool for civilian rescue and professional uses. They have a Teflon coating and a 3-inch push button. The blade length is 3 1/2 inches and comes with a seat belt and web cutter. 

Now You Know About the Best Automatic Knives

We have given you a detailed look at some of the best automatic knives on the market. From ones that look beautiful to ones that can save your life, you’re sure to find the best knife for your toolkit. For more information on knives be sure to check out the rest of our website

The Complete History of the Katana: The Traditional Samurai Sword

Have you ever wondered about the history of the Katana? Have you wanted to know where it came from and who wielded it first?

If so, you’re in the right place! 

We have compiled a complete history of the infamous Katana blade so you can know everything about this legendary sword.

To find out the complete history of the Katana, keep reading below and learn what you came here to learn. 

What is the Katana Sword and Who Used it?

The Katana is a Japenese sword that is characterized by its curved, single-edged blade. It has a circular or squared guard and a long grip so it can be held by two hands.

This sword is usually known as a samurai sword since it was the blade samurais preferred to wield. With this said, it is easily the world’s most popular and most recognized sword. 

The word Katana refers to the family of swords to which it belongs. This sword family is known to have a blade length of more than 2 shaku or Japenese feet which is about 60 cm. 

The Kamakura Period – When the Katana is First Mentioned

The first mentioning of the Katana was during Japan’s Kamakura Period which was between 1185 to 1333. During this time the word was used to describe a long sword that had similar characteristics to the Tachi but without the nuances. 

The Katana differed from the Tachi because it had a longer and more curved blade. The biggest positive to the Katana, when compared to the Tachi, was that it had more strength and power than its sister.

When the Mongols Invade – the Need For a New Blade

Most historians believe that Japanese swordsmiths created the Katana due to providing a better need for weapons to use against the invaders. During the span of 1274 to 1281 the armies led by Kublai Khan wanted to conquer Japan, the samurais noticed that their Tachi blades would chip when they came in contact with the Mongol armor.

Due to this, the Japanese swordsmiths worked to engineer a blade that was sturdier than the Tachi. This led to the creation of the Katana.

The Birth of a Blade to Protect a Country

Through the Muromachi period (which spaned 1337 to 1573) the swordsmiths worked to perfect the Katana. They did so by using a different heat treatment to help create a flexible spine and a strong edge. 

This heat would also help to create higher carbon iron. After many trials, the end result would be a blade-like no other, and one that would rise above all others.

In the year 1400, the Japanese swordsmiths began adding a name to the blade, the name of “Katana.” It’s believed that this name was given in response to the change within Samuari culture. 

Until this moment in time samurai warriors had worn their blades with the cutting edge facing down towards the ground. The Katana was the first sword worn with the blade facing up. 

The Birth of the Modern Katana After Samauris Were Abolished 

During the Meiji period from 1868 to 1912, the samurai class was dissolved. This means that no one held the samurai title anymore and the benefits and privileges granted to them were taken away, this even included the benefit of carrying swords in the public eye.

At this point in time, the only people allowed to carry swords in public were former samurai lords, the military, and the police. This limitation made life hard for the swordsmiths and they had to resort to creating items such as farming equipment to make a living.

This slump wasn’t long-lived. During the Meiji period war between Japan and Russia invoked the production of swords again. Then during World War II, all officers were required to wear a sword, which meant business was booming yet again for the swordsmiths.

Since swords had to be crafted fast to meed the military demand, some corners were cut. The Katanas produced were not made out of Japanese steel, power hammers were used, quenching in oil instead of water.

This meant that the swords weren’t handmade and the quality was lower than that of the Katanas made in previous time periods. These cheaper and faster methods brought the birth of the modern Katana, which most Katanas made today are made with these steps unless otherwise stated. 

The Katana Blade Today

Fast forward to today and the Katana is still popular. Even though the production of the sword has slowed down, especially after World War II. After the war Japan agreed to stop the production of weapons, this included swords which led to fewer Katanas.

There is a Katana revival happening in today’s world. Now there are companies around the world, and even in Japan, that is producing the sword to keep up with the current demand. 

Now You Know the History of the Katana Sword

If you’re a Katana enthusiast or if you’re someone who is interested in the vast history of the blade you now have completed the crash course. We informed you of the Katana history through the different periods of Japan up to today.

You know that samurais were the first to wield the legendary Katana and why the Katana blade had to be created to help better defend themselves against the Mongols. 

You’re even aware of the history of the Katana after samurais’ lost their privileges and benefits. The slump in Katana production wasn’t long-lived and went back up during World War II. For more information on blades be sure to check out the rest of our website here

How to Master the Art of Butterfly Knife Tricks in a Few Easy Steps

Knives have been used as weapons and tools for thousands of years and are some of the oldest that human society has ever seen. Not all knives were created equal, though.

Originally known as the ‘Balisong,’ the butterfly knife is a Filipino tool that was originally designed for both self-defense and basic utility. Today, though, they’re a popular choice among collectors due to the number of tricks you can perform.

While these may seem impossible at first, they’re entirely doable with enough practice. 

Not sure where to start? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Let’s take a look at everything you need to know about butterfly knife tricks.

Before You Begin…

It’s likely that you’re going to fail tricks numerous times while learning them. Unfortunately, failing with a butterfly knife doesn’t always mean dropping the blade or performing the trick slowly/incorrectly.

It’s relatively easy (and common) for beginners to fold the blade onto their hand or finger. Depending on the sharpness of the blade, this could either be a minor knick or a trip to the emergency room.

So, consider taping the edges of your knife in order to dull the surface while you’re practicing. Alternatively, there are butterfly knives designed with safety in mind that you can use to practice with.

Once you’ve decided which safety precaution is right for you, you’re ready to move onto learning a few basic tricks.

Flip Opening

This is likely the first trick you’ll attempt to learn (as you should since it allows you to open the knife!) Although the end result of a flip opening is holding the knife stationary in your hand, the actual process is often mesmerizing for onlookers.

To begin, hold the closed knife in your dominant hand. Your grip should be loose, and your focus should be on the handle that the back of the blade points to.

Swing the knife open until the other handle touches the back of your hand. It should look like an arcing motion. Then, rotate the handle so that the blade is pointing the same direction as your thumb.

Complete the same motion again (which is similar to casting a fishing line in reverse). Afterward, ‘cast’ the knife forward and it should be fully open. Then, place your thumb around both handles to secure your grip.

This will likely seem confusing at first. But, you can practice each segment of the move in slow motion until you master the basics.

Flip Closing

As the name implies, this is the same concept as flipping the knife open (but in reverse).

Once you’ve mastered the open flip technique, you’ll have an understanding of how to perform this one. It’s important, though, to remember to keep your palms open wide enough to hold both handles when you flip it closed.

Otherwise, you’ll run the risk of injuring your fingers when you begin to perform the trick with a sharp-bladed butterfly knife.

Aerial

This will likely come as a big jump from a conventional flip open. The good news is, though, is that mastering a flip open/close will familiarize you with the mechanics of your knife. This will allow you to manipulate it at a more proficient level.

To begin, hold the opposite handle as you would for a flip open. This is the same handle that would let the blade cut you if it closed on you.

Point the knife straight outward so that the knife could open on its own if you let go due to gravity. This is where the move gets complicated.

Perform an upward motion with your wrist as you drop the second handle (the one that is currently holding the knife closed) and let go of the knife. the leverage and momentum of the swinging handle will cause the knife to rotate in midair.

After a full rotation, you can catch the knife in its open position.

Not only is this move far flashier than a flip open, but it’s also much quicker to perform. 

Pinwheel

This knife move is notorious for being portrayed in media. If you’ve ever seen a film where an antagonist brandishes a butterfly knife before combat, you’ve more than likely seen a pinwheel performed.

The backhand variant of the pinwheel, in particular, is rather intimidating, so it makes sense as to why they would write this action into a movie.

For the sake of simplicity, though, we’ll focus on the forehand pinwheel.

Hold the knife as you would if you were beginning to perform an aerial. Let the knife open on its own, but don’t let go.

With an upward flick of the wrist, use the momentum to swing the open handle over to the back of the handle you’re holding. As you do this, point your thumb and index finger outward so that the handles can touch freely.

Now, perform the same motion again. The thing to watch out for here, though, is that the sharp side of the blade will be flipping toward your hand. So, it’s imperative that you ensure your fingers aren’t in the way.

Over time, you’ll be able to perform this movement quickly and repeatedly (which is what makes it appear so intimidating).  

Learning Butterfly Knife Tricks Can Seem Intimidating

It may seem hard to get started and learn what you need to know for these tricks, but it doesn’t have to be.

With the above information about butterfly knife tricks in mind, you’ll be well on your way to mastering the basics and moving on toward advanced techniques.

Want to learn more about how we can help? Feel free to get in touch with us today to see what we can do.

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